Tag Archives: writing tips

He Said, She Said: Why Tags Matter When Writing Dialogue

glenniswritingabc blogs

He Said, She Said: Why Tags Matter When Writing Dialogue
Hello writing friends,

one of my my able assistants is the autocrit editing programme. Without it my writing struggles to keep the writing rules. According to editors and publishers there are right and wrong ways of writing. Especially, in our attempts to show rather than tell. As I have reworked my novel, with autocrit beside me, I observed my novel turn from one of a new writer to a more concise manuscript. Enjoy this autocrit blog on Writing Dialogue in a Novel. Glennis

Dialogue tags – words such as said, replied or asked – have magical powers.

Why are they magical? Well, because they disappear. Readers unconsciously skip right over them.

And that’s what you want them to do!

When writing dialogue in a book, tags exist for only one purpose: to identify who is speaking. That’s it. You want…

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The Unwritten Rules of Blogging

Novelty Revisions

New bloggers and seasoned bloggers alike have similar questions when it comes to doing their best work on their websites. What’s the right way to do this? How do I grow my audience? How do I increase engagement? How do I know I’m not somehow messing all this up?

There are the typical blogging rules all bloggers know to follow: write well, insert as much media as possible, use keywords, etc., etc.

But what about the rules not everyone talks about — the “unwritten rules”?

So I’m going to write down these unwritten rules for you, because I’m a writer and that’s what I do. My approach to blogging comes from over 8 years of typing words and hitting publish and still not always knowing exactly what people want from me — but I love every minute of it, and any wisdom I do have from all my years of…

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Writing Chapter One – Tips

Myths of the Mirror

chapter-one-tips

I’ve wanted to write about first chapters for a while, primarily because they’re so important. After all, they’re the gateway to Chapter 2 and getting a reader to Chapter 2 is a fantastic idea.

I did some research and almost instantly the rule-resistant rebel in me kicked in. She’s the writer who scowls at formulas, who insists that form has to fit the story, not the other way around. She’s the reader who doesn’t want to read the same story over and over with different titles.

Well, I suppressed the first-born smarty-pants part of my personality and learned a few things.

First, I learned that there are actually a number of perfectly legitimate types of first chapters. Writer’s Digest has a great article by Jeff Gerke that describes 4 approaches with examples (summarized here):

  • The Prolog – A prolog is an episode that pertains to your story but does not…

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4 Tips for Writing a Killer Ending to Your Story

J. Young-Ju Harris

When it comes down to it there is really only one rule about writing a good ending for a story: the ending you write has to fulfill the promises you made during your story.

The much tougher part can be coming up with an ending that succeeds in doing that. I think as authors we all want that amazing ending that not only satisfies the reader but makes them think about what they read and remember it years down the line.

Sadly, I can’t tell you how to write the perfect ending, but I can give you some tips about things that will make the ending of your story work. I will leave the creative and artist decisions that make it truly stand out to you.

1.) Don’t Leave Any Questions Unanswered

Throughout your story, your job as a writer is to raise questions (i.e. conflicts). But by the end…

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Why You Should Write Your First Draft Before Outlining Your Novel

Writers After Dark

outline-after-first-draftI often say I suffer from CRD—Chronic Rewriting Disease, a term I made up because it seems at least 50% of my work needs to be rewritten. But that’s my writing process, and I accept it. Sure, I could be like many writers and outline my novel from the start . . . but my brain doesn’t function that way. I’m a pantser, and that’s the way (uh-huh, uh-huh) I like it (uh-huh, uh-huh).

My secret is in outlining AFTER completing my first draft.

At first, I had some stressful moments, questioning my writing process. We all have to choose our methods, but inevitably we all reach a point where we wonder if what we’re doing is effective. So if you’ve reached this point and are interested in trying something new—even if you’re a hardcore pantser—I’m going to ask that you give this a shot. Pants away, but then use…

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How Literary Devices Can Add Depth to Your Writing – ProWritingAid

Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Have you ever heard of a red herring? Don’t know what it means? Read by clicking the highlighted link below to find out how to add drama to your writing. ❤

The term “literary device” refers to some common techniques that writers use to add meaning to their writing and get their message across more poignantly. When mastered, literary devices can help your reader interpret your scenes and understand your ideas with greater depth.There are hundreds of literary devices to choose from, but let’s talk about some of the ones that will add layers to your writing.

Source: How Literary Devices Can Add Depth to Your Writing – ProWritingAid

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Don’t Even Think of Publishing Unless You’ve Done These 4 Things

A Writer's Path

Typewriter

by Rachael Hanel

Whenever I give writing workshops or teach a writing class, I always end with “going from here.” Now that the students have learned something (hopefully!), what do they need to do to get their work published?

I say, don’t even think about publishing until you’ve done the following:

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