Tag Archives: writing advice

Real Writers Persist. Always.

A Writer's Path

by Lauren Sapala

When writers first start out writing they tend to concentrate on all the wrong things. The big question always seems to be: Do I have talent? This is followed closely by: How do I get an agent? When I was a new writer I also agonized quite a bit over these things. It’s very normal. Whenever a person begins to truly take risks and follow their passion, the first challenges to surface are always questions of self worth and approval from others.

And make no mistake, that IS what the talent and agent questions are really all about: self worth and approval. Every human being goes through it in one form or another. For writers, anxiety and obsession about how much talent they have and getting an agent is just how it typically manifests.

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12 Reasons You’re Not Writing What You Want to Write

Novelty Revisions

1. You don’t know what you really want to write about yet.

2. You have a lot going on, and just haven’t made the time for it lately.

3. Or, more accurately, your time management skills need some work. (You know who you are.)

4. You’re not sure spending time on the thing you REALLY want to work on will actually be worth it.

5. You’re mostly writing about what you know your friends/family would be interested in reading.

6. You’re sticking with what’s most popular, because it’s safer.

7. You know what’s going to — and what isn’t going to — make you the most money.

8. You haven’t broken into your “niche space” yet, or don’t know how to.

9. You’re convinced it’s not “unique” enough to matter.

10. Two words: Self. Doubt.

11. You know getting it “right” is going to take a lot of work, and…

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Things to Consider Before Starting A Second Blog

Novelty Revisions

Some people find they love blogging so much that they want to do more of it. And sometimes, the urge to start and manage a second blog becomes too tempting to resist. That’s why many blogs fail — because people aren’t prepared for them. You’d think, already having one blog, you’d know better. But we’re writers, we’re not perfect — sometimes we make bad decisions that can hurt one or both of your blogs.

In this post, I’ll mostly be talking about starting a second blog on top of one you plan to continue keeping up with — not starting another blog to replace one you’re leaving behind. Most people assume they can keep up with more than one blog simultaneously, underestimating the amount of work that goes into each — causing both to fall apart. I don’t want that to happen to you. So here’s what you should think…

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Just Write! Stop Waiting for the Good Stuff

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

By: Marilyn L. Davis

“A day of bad writing is always better than a day of no writing.” ― Don Roff

When I think of peoples’ job titles and descriptions, I get an idea of what they do every day.

  • Counselor? They listen to people talk about their problems, help them find solutions, and, well, counsel.
  • Artist? They draw, paint, and create, well, art.
  • Welder? They join metals together, fusing, compressing, and well, welding materials together.
  • Writer? Well, duh, they write.

I’ve said before that I have a hard time thinking of other professions where people are allowed to say, “I’m not feeling it.” Oh, maybe they say it, but they show up anyway. We writers, on the other hand, can avoid the pen/paper/computer/laptop and find umpteen reasons not to sit and write.

I think one of the poorest excuses we give ourselves is that we don’t have anything good…

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The Simple way to Write Non-fiction Creatively

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

Featured Image: Fact and Fiction, Separate but Intertwined

By Peter B. Giblett

According to the Independent Book Publishers Association, the biggest growth areas in books are:

  • Personal development & self-help
  • Religion
  • Biography, autobiography, or memoirs
  • Business
  • Graphic novels

The fact that four out five of these categories are non-fiction suggests there is real growth in this type of writing. Modern audiences are drawn to non-fiction writing. Historically, non-fiction writing was considered boring, but there isn’t any reason it must be. Open any nonfiction work, and the reader should be excited to explore the knowledge the writer is sharing. There are some great stories available, they simply require writing.


You may know the following, considered one of the great opening sentences in fiction:

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was…

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Why You Should Write Your First Draft Before Outlining Your Novel

Writers After Dark

outline-after-first-draftI often say I suffer from CRD—Chronic Rewriting Disease, a term I made up because it seems at least 50% of my work needs to be rewritten. But that’s my writing process, and I accept it. Sure, I could be like many writers and outline my novel from the start . . . but my brain doesn’t function that way. I’m a pantser, and that’s the way (uh-huh, uh-huh) I like it (uh-huh, uh-huh).

My secret is in outlining AFTER completing my first draft.

At first, I had some stressful moments, questioning my writing process. We all have to choose our methods, but inevitably we all reach a point where we wonder if what we’re doing is effective. So if you’ve reached this point and are interested in trying something new—even if you’re a hardcore pantser—I’m going to ask that you give this a shot. Pants away, but then use…

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Solution Saturday: I’m Not a Good Enough Writer

Writing a full-length book can be challenging. Here are three practical solutions to motivate you to keep writing.

Novelty Revisions


We all have those days when we just don’t feel like what we’re writing is good enough. It’s a natural part of the writing process; a little bit of doubt here and there helps us remember we’re not perfect, and we still have a lot to learn.

But when that doubt stretches on too long, it can make us want to quit. Do not save changes. Delete.

Here are three solutions to slowly building up your confidence and reigniting your love for writing—which is why you started writing in the first place.

Solution 1: Read More Books

If you’re already a writer, it’s pretty likely you’re a reader, too. Reading successful authors’ work, over and over again, might have been what started this confidence drought in the first place. “They’re so good at writing! Why can’t I be that good?”

Don’t forget even your favorite authors have agents and editors…

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