Tag Archives: writing

Saving Money on Editing: Tips on Self-Editing

Kobo Writing Life

Hiring the right editor for the appropriate edits can often be one of the most challenging as well as the most expensive steps in the publishing process for an author. So what are one of the many things an author can do to save money?

Janell E. Robisch, the owner of Speculations Editing Services, an editor with more than twenty years of experience in the publishing industry, has a new book in which she not only shares tips on how to find the best editor for you and your specific writing projects, but also how to save money.

One of the ways an author can save money is by self-editing before submitting their work to an editor.

The following is an excerpt from Chapter Two of her book Saving Money on Editing & Choosing the Best Editor, which offers helpful advice on that topic.

Self-editing can also save…

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Should You Publish a Second Edition…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

by Stephanie Chandler  on Nonfiction Authors Association Site:

The phrase “now in its second edition” would sound pretty great next to your nonfiction book title, wouldn’t it?

Traditional publishers might suggest a second edition if the first one sells well or if the content changes regularly. Indie authors can decide for themselves when the time is right to do a second, third, or fourth edition of their books.

I recently published a second edition of my book Subscription Marketing. Just over two years had passed since the first publication, but the Subscription Economy moves quickly. Stuff that seemed fresh in 2015 now looked stale. And my opinions have become stronger as I’ve spoken with people after the first edition.

So I took the plunge and updated the book. Along the way, I picked up a few pointers about doing a second edition. Here are the pros and cons, questions to…

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#BookReview – P.S. I Forgive You – A Broken Legacy by D.G. Kaye #Memoir #Narcissism

deborahjay

On the eve of my father’s funeral, I find myself writing my review of this memoir with a real sense of gratitude that I was lucky enough to have loving parents, and little dysfunctionality in my family. My father was raised in a rather Victorian household, (he was born in 1915), where children were seen but not heard, which made him always a quiet man, but no less loving for it, though he rarely expressed emotion.

Tomorrow I shall say goodbye to him in the knowledge that he lived a long and satisfied life, leaving no regrets at the end on any of our parts, unlike my poor friend Debby Gies (author D.G. Kaye), who suffered a traumatic childhood.

Thanks, Debby. Whilst I sorrow for your travails, you’ve gifted me with a great contrast to recognise at this sad time how fortunate I have been.

P.S. I Forgive You: A Broken LegacyP.S. I Forgive You: A Broken Legacy by D.G…

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How to Give Your Narration Flavor

A Writer's Path

by Andrea Lundgren

Readers frequently talk about the style or narrative flavor of authors they enjoy. They’ll say, “That sounds like something __ wrote,” or “This reminded me of ___” or “The tone of that was flat.” But sometimes, we authors we sometimes don’t know what gives us our writing voice. What makes writing sound different or interesting and engaging?

Our voice is really the flavor that is distinctly ours. It’s like the spices that make Italian different than French or German cooking. They may have similar topography or features; in certain portions of those countries, there may just be an imaginary line between one part and another, to where the climate, soil types, and weather are identical. Similarly, our writing might be similar to that of another in genre, plot elements, and character types but yet be unique because of the “spices” we employ.

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