Tag Archives: writers

Why You Need an Author Profile – And Where to Post It

One of my hugely informative author profiles. Don’t do this. Author profiles are an essential part of book marketing and promotion. An a…

Source: Why You Need an Author Profile – And Where to Post It

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How to Spark Your Story With an Inciting Incident

First Edition Design Publishing - a hybrid publisher

If you are planning on writing a story, there is something you need to consider besides basic plot structure. You need to determine your Inciting Incident.

What incident will compel your protagonist to act?

What Is an Inciting Incident?

I am reading The Story Grid by Shawn Coyne and Story by Robert McGee to learn how to write a compelling story. Both Coyne and McGee emphasize the importance of writing a compelling inciting incident.

To incite means to stir, encourage, or urge on; to stimulate or prompt to action.

An inciting incident, then, is an event that forces your protagonist to act, compelling them to stop sitting around and do something.

Shawn Coyne has this to say about inciting incidents:

No matter the unit of story (beat, scene, sequence, act, or global Story) what the inciting incident must do is upset the life balance of your lead protagonist/s. It must make them…

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Personalizing Your Character’s Emotional Wound

First Edition Design Publishing - a hybrid publisher

Emotional wounds are tricky to write about.

Abuse, betrayal, victimization, and the death of a loved one may exist in our characters’ pasts and so must be explored.

But these are also real life events that cause damage to real people.

So as I talk today about personalizing wounds for our characters, please know that I’m aware of the pain they cause in our world, and I applaud the courageous individuals who fight to come to grips with them every day.

Why Wounding Events Matter in Fiction

Wounding events greatly affect a character’s development, so they’re important to identify.

These painful experiences are deeply impactful, giving birth to life-altering fears, new habits and behaviors, even flaws meant to protect her from facing that pain again.

Wounding events are aptly named because they change who the character is; until they’re faced and addressed, she will never be whole.

But pinpointing what…

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WRITE 1,000 WORDS EVERY DAY: Create a Writing Schedule

Matthew Howard

Write 1,000 words every day. It might be the best writing advice I ever got. Yes, we can learn much about the craft of writing, about style and narrative structure and how to research. But to be a writer, you need to write.

1,000 words per day is an easy goal. Professional writers commit to more—even much more. But if you have other commitments in life besides writing, set a goal where you can under-promise and over-deliver. I often start a daily 1,000 and end up with 2,500. I got on a roll one weekend and drafted a 10,000-word story in two days.

The 1,000-word goal keeps the pump primed for great days like those. If it’s difficult at first, it gets easier when you stick to it! How long does it take to reach 1,000 words? If the project requires intense planning, plotting, or thinking about complex material…

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Using Triggers to Poke at a Character’s Emotional Wound

Kobo Writing Life

By Angela Ackerman

When it comes to acknowledging what hurts us, the old saying, Deny, deny, deny! comes to mind. Why? Because in real life we don’t want to appear weak, so when we suffer emotional pain, we often stuff it down deep and paste on a smile as if nothing is wrong. It’s no different with our characters, and in both cases, refusing to deal with wounding events carries a steep price.

Unresolved psychological pain doesn’t go away and hiding it only leads to dysfunction and unhappiness.

Emotional trauma is, by nature, painful. When it happens, our feelings are laid bare. So it’s no wonder that last thing anyone wants to do is unpack that vulnerability again to work through it. Avoidance seems better, but it leads to dysfunctional coping methods like bad habits, flaws, biases, and emotional reactiveness.

This type of emotional shielding keeps people and further possible…

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The Five Stages Of Revising Your Novel

Kobo Writing Life

By Lisa M. Lilly

You’ve finished a first draft of your novel. Now what?

If you’re like most writers (including me), your draft includes points that require more research, scenes that trail off, plot holes, or all of the above.

Addressing every issue at once is overwhelming. The five steps below can organize and speed up your revision process.

Step One: Start With The Story

Once you’ve let your novel sit for at least a week, read it all the way through. Focus on your plot, asking yourself:

  • Is there conflict on page one?
  • Does the plot turn in a significant way at each quarter point in the novel?
  • Is your protagonist actively pursuing her goals?
  • Does your antagonist strenuously oppose your protagonist?
  • Does tension increase as the story progresses?
  • Do the events logically flow from one another?
  • Does your climax resolve the major plot issues and pay off emotionally…

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Why I prefer nonfiction over fiction

Sarahbeth Caplin

35244821086_e8236a33a9_z1-300x200Since I was a child, I’ve dreamed of becoming the next great American novelist. I have published a few novels, and yet none of them are quite as dear to my heart as my two memoirs. I realized something critical about myself the more I’ve devoted myself to nonfiction writing (mostly about the intersection of faith and politics): I’m not very good at making things up.

If there’s anything I’ve learned during my time as a graduate student of creative nonfiction, it’s that memoir writing, and even literary essays, can follow a story arc similar to what you’ll find in fiction: there is a beginning, a development of conflict, a set of characters (even if the only character is the writer herself), a middle, and a resolution. Like fiction, nonfiction doesn’t require a neat, tidy ending. But a decisive finishing point is required just the same.

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37 Top Book Awards for Authors in 2017

The Book Publicist

Book Awards for Authors

Enter Book Award Contests and Become an Award Winning Author in 2017!

By Scott Lorenz

Westwind Communications

“Do book awards matter?”  YES!!

As a book publicist I can assure you they absolutely do matter! One client won several awards and was contacted by two movie producers about her Young Adult Sci-Fi Fantasy Fiction novel.  Another one of my clients won the prestigious Los Angeles Book Festival award. That then led to a flurry of media interest, which subsequently led to a major New York agent deciding to represent the book and pitch it to all the major publishing houses. This author, needless to say, was happy he decided to enter.

You win awards you sell more products.  Jeff Bezos, CEO Amazon

Jeff Bezos at the 2016 Code Conference Jeff Bezos at the 2016 Code Conference (Photo news.techniblogic.com

Recently a business book client won a major award which caused CNN to reach out to request the book.

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