Tag Archives: writer

How Writers Get Paid: A Beginner’s Guide to Book Royalties

Kristen Twardowski

800px-BilleteiNTER_II

Congratulations! You have signed with a publisher that wants to bring your book to the market. But how will you get paid for book sales? What royalties are considered normal?

I suppose I should backtrack. First of all, how do traditional publishers pay authors, and what exactly are royalties?

Publishers typically pay authors in several ways: advances and royalties.

—     —     —

Advances – Advances are initial, upfront payments presented to authors. Their full name is advances against royalties, so if a publisher offers an author a $1000 advance, that author will not begin to earn additional royalties until after the book has already “earned back” that $1000. Even if the book never earns $1000 worth of royalties, the author still gets to keep the advance.

Royalties – Royalties are the amounts of money an author earns on each book sold. In traditional publishing, authors tend to…

View original post 510 more words

Advertisements

Levels of Crazy

Exclusive Inflictions

It never ceases to amaze me
How many levels there are to crazy
When you stand back and look
You realize it’s not a fictional book

Memoirs at fingertips, waiting
All the while I’m here anticipating
The backlash that has me debating
If the truth is even worth saying

The Who, when, where and why
Changed to protect innocent lives
From the incriminating evidence
To keep from being that elephant

View original post

#ExcerptWeek – D. G. Kaye @pokecubster

The Write Stuff

ps_300x450_72dpi

Today, I’m very happy to welcome D. G. Kaye to #ExcerptWeek here on The Write Stuff. Deb has been having all kinds of frustrating issues this last week, with both her ability to comment on this and other blogs, and issues getting her latest book formatted and published. I’m happy to say that things are starting to look up, and proud to present this excerpt for your reading pleasure. As always, please remember to share far and wide. And now, the floor is yours, Deb. Take it away!

P.S. I Forgive You

P.S. I Forgive You is a sequel to Conflicted Hearts, a memoir about my narcissistic mother, and the psychological hold she had on me by instilling guilt and fear when her demands weren’t complied with, and the heartache she bestowed on her loved ones.

This sequel is a stand alone in its own right. It’s a new journey…

View original post 741 more words

Using Candy Land to Write Your Memoir

Live to Write - Write to Live

candy land 2

When you teach a writing class, you often get students who want to share their personal writing. I don’t mind a bit, in fact I encourage my students to share as much as they’d like to.

One of my students recently handed me a multi-chaptered piece that he was working on. It was a memoir of his life. Although there was a lot of good information, and even though he had a good voice in his writing, the piece was not going to go far without a major revision.

What memoir isn’t

First of all – a memoir is not a diary. It’s not about what you do on a day-to-day basis.

What a memoir is

A memoir is a story of how you got from here to there. In its rawest form it’s like a game of Candy Land.

“Here” is where a life changing event occurs. This life…

View original post 510 more words

James Baldwin’s FBI File

readers+writers journal

James Baldwin and the FBI Why Did the FBI Spy on Author James Baldwin?

Hannah K. Gold via The Intercept

James Baldwin’s FBI file contains 1,884 pages of documents, collected from 1960 until the early 1970s. During that era of illegal surveillance of American writers, the FBI accumulated 276 pages on Richard Wright, 110 pages on Truman Capote, and just nine pages on Henry Miller. Baldwin’s file was closer in size to activists and radicals of the day — for example, it’s nearly half as thick as Malcolm X’s.

All Those StrangersIn his new biography, All Those Strangers, Douglas Field decodes these files with great literary and historical finesse. Baldwin often said that his relation to politics was that of a “witness,” but he was vehemently stalked, harassed and even censored by the FBI. Field asserts that after looking through Baldwin’s FBI file, it’s clear his phone was tapped and that government agents, posing as publishers…

View original post 545 more words