Tag Archives: Toni Morrison

Book Review: God Help the Child by Toni Morrison

POVone: The First Person Perspective

Author: Toni Morrison
Title: God Help the Child
Genre: Literary
Publication Date: April 21, 2015
Publisher: Random House
Number of Pages: 192
Narrator: Sweetness, Bride, Etc.
Quality Rating: 80.52

God Help the Child by Toni Morrison

What’s It About?

Sweetness is a light-skinned black woman married to a light-skinned black man. They’re so light-skinned that they can pass as whites, and they live in such a time that it is beneficial to do so. Everything is going perfectly in their relationship until Sweetness gives birth to a baby girl who has extremely dark skin. Embarrassed, her husband leaves her to raise the girl on her own.

As the little girl grows, she feels the constant contempt of her mother. When she is six years old, she falsely accuses a woman of child molestation and sends her to prison for fifteen years–simply because she wants to gain her mother’s approval. The…

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Toni Morrison’s ‘God Help the Child’

LifeBlood

Reading Toni’s literature for the first time was, for me, surreal. Her literature is heavy. Each novel is emotionally taxing to read. You will feel pain. Her literature is retributive. Each novel has a purpose beyond entertainment. You will be moved. Her literature is meticulous. Each word is conscientiously placed. You will be awestruck. Her literature is a duality. She creates darkness, and, within it, great hope. You will feel both.

DSC00090

Toni Morrison invites you into her world, enables you to be her characters, to feel what they do, and she does so with graceful, lyrical prose. By the time I had only read half of The Bluest Eye, the first of her books that I read, I understood that her talent was extraordinary. I was in class when I learned she was publishing a new novel (God Help the Child, April 2015), and upon being released, I…

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Mommie Dearest Darkly: Toni Morrison’s God Help the Child

Morrison’s latest book, God Help the Child, captivates me (even though I haven’t read it yet) because it deals with the subject of a not so great relationship between a mother and daughter, not to mention the fact that this was the title (except mine was God Bless the Child) that I had chosen for my upcoming memoir. Billy Holiday is saying a lot in her song.) The reviews, so far, are mixed, solidifying my belief that not everyone can relate to mothers who are not conventional–in a Hallmark kind of way, emotional abuse or the children, who eventually become adults, who bear the scars of unconventional parenting. Still, there are many who can. I chose this book as the selection for the month of June because this book, written by an well-known author, I believe can help people to understand the effect of emotional abuse on children, especially when it comes from a mother. The review below will give you a good feel for the book.

Patricia Lundy

Mommie Dearest tells the story of perhaps the most iconic inversion of what an ideal mother should be like: beautiful and successful on the surface, rotten on the inside. Yet perhaps other mothers damage more subtly, more terribly, even. At its essence, God Help the Child is about a woman’s reckoning with her childhood scars, and these scars ultimately stem from her mother’s rejection of her due to her dark black skin. Bride, the novel’s protagonist, is the beautiful, successful, materialistic executive of YOU, GIRL cosmetics. She only wears shades of white- creams, milks, and snows- to compliment her unforgettable blue-black skin. For someone who was never supposed to be gorgeous by her mother’s standards, Bride is stunning. And though her looks are admired by many, perhaps they’re most admired by herself. Like Joan Crawford, Bride’s mother, whom she is never allowed to call mother (instead she calls her Sweetness…

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Toni Morrison Talks New Book & Diversity In Literature In New York Times Magazine

I don’t think it’s a coincidence that Penguin Random House is releasing Toni Morrison’s new book, God Help the Child, in April–Child Abuse Prevention Month. I love that her title is inspired by Billy Holiday’s God Bless the Child. I can already tell that this novel, about a mother-daughter relationship, is going to impact me just like a good memoir would.

Black America Web

At 84 years old, literary legend Toni Morrison has no intention of putting down her pen just yet.

The New York Times Magazine put the Nobel Prize winning-author on the cover of this week’s issue, and it ran a profile of her online. In the interview, Toni shares her thoughts on diversity in literature, her new novel “God Help The Child” (due out April 21), and how writing protects her.

Toni recalls wanting to fill a void in Black literature, which she felt wasn’t doing much to appeal to women in the community. However, she still found an interesting thread in the books that were available before she began her own illustrious writing career

“In so many earlier books by African-American writers, particularly the men, I felt that they were not writing to me. But what interested me was the African-American experience throughout whichever time I spoke of,” she told…

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Inspired: Writer Toni Morrison proves we have time to follow our passions

Christa Avampato

Toni Morrison Toni Morrison

Toni Morrison taught me two priceless lessons: I can always make time to write and never give up. As a single mom with 2 kids, Morrison wrote her first novel, The Bluest Eye, in 15-minute increments each day. That’s all the free time she had. It took her 5 years to write it. She kept writing despite her novel’s low sales. 3 years later, her next novel was nominated for the American Book Award. Her following novels received mixed reviews, but she remained determined. In 1987, 17 years after publishing her first novel, she won the Pulitzer. If you have a dream project, work on it bit by bit. Don’t let critics sap the joy you get from your work. Morrison followed her passion. You can, too.

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