Tag Archives: survivor

How Dare the Sun Rise by Sandra Uwiringiyimana

Cumberland Regional HS Media Center

How Dare the Sun Rise: Memoirs of a War Child by Sandra Uwiringiyimana. May 16, 2017. Katherine Tegen Books, 304 p. ISBN: 9780062470140.  Int Lvl: YA; Rdg Lvl: YA; Lexile: 790.

In this powerful memoir, Sandra Uwiringyimana, a girl from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, tells the incredible true story of how she survived a massacre, immigrated to America, and overcame her trauma through art and activism.

Sandra Uwiringiyimana was just ten years old when she found herself with a gun pointed at her head. The rebels had come at night—wielding weapons, torches, machetes. She watched as her mother and six-year-old sister were gunned down in a refugee camp, far from their home in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The rebels were killing people who weren’t from the same community, the same tribe. In other words, they were killing people simply for looking different.

“Goodbye, life,” she said to…

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Abuse victims. Writing their truth.

Julie Mariner

img_3446Back in 2015 Brandon O’Neill wrote a blog for The Spectator chronicling the case of pianist James Rhodes and his victory in court overturning a legal injunction which was preventing him from publishing his child abuse memoir. It is a particularly harrowing account of sexual abuse which leaves little to the imagination.

Not only does O’Neill negate Rhodes’ ‘pornographic detail of abuse’ as he so eloquently puts it but he further goes on to question why we need ‘misery memoirs’ in the first place. The purpose of his article is to beg the question ‘Why can’t the past stay private?’ Writing for the Telegraph back in 2008, Sam Leith again highlighted why we have a need for this kind of memoir with the attention grabbing headline ‘Misery memoirs make pornography of personal pain.

In 2006, 11 of the top 100 best selling English paperbacks were ‘mis lit’ as its so…

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The true definition of “Healing”

roadtotranscendence

Healing…

Such a powerful and terrifying word.

Entirely elusive in its very nature…and yet completely attainable. While it is reserved for the strong, there are no restrictions on anyone becoming strong enough to reach it. At the same time, you must find the strength to find the strength…

So here I am left on this undeniably painful path to recovery. Recovery from the past, the present and simply…recovery from life, which has left me questioning why (or how) some are able to find themselves “healed” while others are simply moving through this world in a state of pure survival rather than living.

This questioning has also left me on a path of discovery. If I can find the answer to the why (or how) then I can find my way to that all too sought after feeling of being healed. That all too sought after peace.

In light of everything…

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Quote of the day # 5 : Dysfunctional Family

Rebellious Scapegoat

Dysfunctional Families – it’s hard to see what’s going on

when you’re inside one.

Victims have difficulties to identify dysfunctional system because this is what they see, hear and learn over years.

Thought this is what “normal” families do.

Photo credit : Pixabay – MemoryCatcher

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5 stages of grief every survivor goes through

Rebellious Scapegoat

Strength shows not only in the ability to persist, but to start over.

Probably many people heard of “5 stages of grief” after the loss of loved-ones or divorce etc.  According to my personal experience, abused survivors also going through similar healing / grieving process.     It’s not necessary have specific order or time limit for each stage as it depends on individuals’ perception / experiences : some may stuck at certain stage much longer than other stages; jump around or wandering back and forth.

Denial

Human born to have coping mechanism to protect ourselves and eliminate pains / hurts while handling disasters/trauma.   But this habit may sometimes obstruct our objective thinking.   For example, when we are confronted by difficult situation we tend to deny the facts.

It’s common to find wives who deny all evidences indicated from their husband’s affairs, they reject to accept the truth that the so-called good marriage…

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