Tag Archives: small press publishers

10 Questions to Ask Before Signing with a Small Press Publisher (Part One)

Writers After Dark

Small press publishing has become a significant cottage industry. Self-publishing changed the book industry’s dynamics, and as many of the large traditional publishers struggled to make profits and maintain relevance, many entrepreneurs saw an opportunity to fill a void. Not burdened by high overhead or restricted by antiquated publishing practices, small press companies have the benefits of agility and flexibility.

For many authors, a small press publishing contract offers a nice “middle ground” between being on their own as an Indie author and the long, often pointless process of courting a major publisher. Understandably, a book contract offers both excitement and a sense of “approval” or acceptance. In short, for some writers, “I’ve been published” feels more legitimate than “I’ve published.” And for those authors not interested in learning about marketing, publishing, sales, editing services, and all the other mechanics that make up “publishing,” a small press can alleviate the…

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10 Questions to Ask Before Signing with a Small Press Publisher (Part Two)

Writers After Dark

The future of traditional publishing may lie in the hands of small press publishers. Their ability to be creative, adaptive, and flexible offers many advantages over the larger houses but as we discussed in Part One of this article, selecting a small press publisher requires some homework.

For an author, nothing is worse than seemingly reaching that publishing dream only to discover their publisher isn’t who you thought they were. Although there is no perfect system and no guarantees, any author considering the small press alternative should, at a minimum, investigate these ten areas before signing a contract.

6. What are their goals and objectives? Many small press publishing companies are owned and operated by a self-published author. It’s smart marketing and good business. Your books are more likely to be purchased by a bookstore if the publisher is listed as a company rather than under the author’s name.

The…

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