Tag Archives: self-publishing

How Working with a Critique Group Can Improve Your Manuscript

I wrote my first four novels without any outside input up to the point when I sent the second draft to a small group of pre-readers, made more changes and then on to my editor. Then I moved home from London to the English south coast and started work on novel number five, which became…

via How Working with a Critique Group can Improve your Manuscripts — Women Writers, Women’s Books

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Using Triggers to Poke at a Character’s Emotional Wound

Kobo Writing Life

By Angela Ackerman

When it comes to acknowledging what hurts us, the old saying, Deny, deny, deny! comes to mind. Why? Because in real life we don’t want to appear weak, so when we suffer emotional pain, we often stuff it down deep and paste on a smile as if nothing is wrong. It’s no different with our characters, and in both cases, refusing to deal with wounding events carries a steep price.

Unresolved psychological pain doesn’t go away and hiding it only leads to dysfunction and unhappiness.

Emotional trauma is, by nature, painful. When it happens, our feelings are laid bare. So it’s no wonder that last thing anyone wants to do is unpack that vulnerability again to work through it. Avoidance seems better, but it leads to dysfunctional coping methods like bad habits, flaws, biases, and emotional reactiveness.

This type of emotional shielding keeps people and further possible…

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Your Five-Minute Guide to Pricing Your Self-Published Book…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

By Fred Johnson on The Book Designer site:

There’s one question that we editors hear again and again from the self-publishing writers we work with: how much should I charge for my first book?

It’s certainly a tricky question. The history of self-publishing is littered with tragic tales of overpriced and underpriced books falling at the wayside as stingy or sceptical crowds pass them by. It’s one of the most common mistakes self-publishing writers make.

What’s the Problem?

Pricing your book isn’t a one-size-fits-all kind of deal. It depends on what you’ve written, how long your book is, how established you are as a writer, and any recognition, reviews, or awards you or your work have amassed. The quality of the cover, formatting, and design will also play an important role. Before you think about pricing your book, look over these tips…

Guide to Pricing Your Self-Published Book

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Review of Green-Light Your Book by Brooke Warner

Author S. Smith

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In April I attended the IBPA PubU in Portland. More about that event here.  Included in our free tote bag with the regular goodies of pens, notepads, etc., was the book, Green-Light Your Bookby Brooke Warner of She Writes Press.

I read the book pretty quickly, but unfortunately didn’t write the review right away. As I look through it now, checking my underlines and attempting to write this review, I realize I could write several pages, much too long for a blog post. I’ll do my best to condense.

First, I really enjoyed Green-Light. Although it seemed meant for the person who has just finished their first manuscript and is still “waiting to be published,” as someone who’s already published several novels, I still found Green-Light to be thought-provoking, inspiring, and contain some useful info (for example, the section on the advantage of forming an LLC).

Anyone…

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Working With Formatters

Lit World Interviews

Quite a few of my clients have come to me to have their books formatted, and then found themselves unable to update their already published works with their latest releases because they don’t have the formatted Word manuscripts on file. That’s fine if the formatter who worked on your previous books is available to do the updates. Hopefully the formatter is still in business and findable, or even alive. Things happen. If you have the formatted manuscripts, either your current formatter, or yourself, can do the updates in minutes and have the incarnations required by the various publishing platforms quickly. If you don’t then you either leave them as they are minus any future updates or have whatever manuscripts that you do have on file reformatted, which is a waste of money.

When hiring people to work on your book, here are a few things to take note of before…

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