Tag Archives: self-publishers

How to do a developmental edit yourself

John Robin's Blog

Friday is here again, which means another blog post from me!

Today I’m following up on last week’s post on the importance of developmental editing, by popular request, with a how-to for writers who want to try and do it themselves. (If you missed last week’s post, read it here.)

Meanwhile, on our blog, I hope you enjoyed this week’s post from Byron Gillan, on magic and environment in fantasy (read it here) and Sean Gallagher’s great post on his own magic in the world of Mysts (read it here). Next month, we’ll be talking about what inspires us to write the fantasy stories we write, so stay tuned for that.

Before I dive into the how-to, I want to announce something exciting that I’m starting next Friday. World Builders 3.0!

For those who followed the World Builders series, this started with the original world builders (read…

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Optimizing Your Online Book Description

ML Keller- The Manuscript Shredder

Effective online book descriptions are more than just the words. The internet is a visual medium, much like a magazine. Readers expect content to be presented in a visually interesting way. This means thinking about your description as a web design project, including visual arts elements, like white space, and formatting your text using HTML. Even if you are not a programmer, simple tags for bold, italic, H1, H2 are easy enough for the novice. (If you still need help, use a WYSIWYG HTML generator. Then, cut and paste the results in your Amazon description.)

Here is a book description that needs revision. Notice how the large block of text is unappealing, even daunting. Readers are conditioned to expect efficient content online, smaller chunks of text, and variety.

bad hook Giant blocks of text turn readers off

When designing your book descriptions, consider how all the elements of the page will work together…

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Top Five Reasons to Self-Publish

theherdlesswitch

Every writer now days has to carefully decide between two roads, traditional publishing, or self-publishing. Both roads, with the proper amount of elbow grease, will technically get you where you really want to be, but both roads are far from equal.

I must confess that just like every other writer out there I started out wanting to go the traditional publishing route. Once I finished my work I even started querying publishers. That was a whole new level for me, it helped me to see what it was really like to compete for a coveted spot on some publishers roster. That was when I realized I wanted to take a crack at self-publishing. Here are my top five reasons for making that decision.

I wish you the best of luck, whichever route you decide to take!

1: Time: I’m sure you’ve heard the old saying, ‘time is money’. So true…

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InDesign Beginner’s Cheat Sheet: Part I

Just Can't Help Writing

This is Part 9 of my “InDesign Beginner’s Cheat Sheet” series. You can follow the links at the bottom of this post to check out the whole series, from opening a file in InDesign to formatting.

In this post: Part 1 of some follow-up moves you can and should make in InDesign as you format your POD book interior.

***CLICK ON THE IMAGES TO SEE FULL-SIZED VERSIONS***

Creating Additional Styles for Chapter Titles and Numbers

Just like Word, InDesign works best if you create a style for each element you use often and apply that style consistently across chapters. So you need a style for whatever elements—for example, chapter names—that you plan to include.

Create these additional styles exactly as you created your original main body style.

  • Select the text you want to style, for example a chapter title.
  • Format it to look the way you want.
  • Click “Create New…

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The Cost of Competitions

Annika Perry's Writing Blog

writer

To pay or not to pay?

Have you ever paid to enter writing competitions; either for short stories, poetry or even submitting a novel? Or perhaps you’d never contemplate having to pay for competitions? 

The topic of writing competitions came up at our last meeting of the local writing group and I was surprised at the varying opinions.

A couple of people seemed genuinely surprised that most competitions charged and that these were successful – I then had to admit to entering some myself with one win, a shortlist and a couple of long-list to my name. 

oldieimageAt first I was overjoyed to have my work professionally validated and deemed worthy to be read in print and it was the confident booster I so desperately needed. The deadlines, themes etc was a great incentive to sit down and write, producing a story in a day or two – then a…

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Why Authors Need to Be as Accessible as Possible

A Writer's Path

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by Katie McCoach

As an author today, you know that every reader is valuable. You love your readers; you want to keep the ones who are loyal and reach new ones. That’s what promotion and growing a business is all about – reaching new consumers.

That’s why it’s so important for authors to be as accessible to readers as possible.The easier a reader can find you and buy your books, the easier it will be to reach wider audiences.

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