Tag Archives: self-editing

Saving Money on Editing: Tips on Self-Editing

Kobo Writing Life

Hiring the right editor for the appropriate edits can often be one of the most challenging as well as the most expensive steps in the publishing process for an author. So what are one of the many things an author can do to save money?

Janell E. Robisch, the owner of Speculations Editing Services, an editor with more than twenty years of experience in the publishing industry, has a new book in which she not only shares tips on how to find the best editor for you and your specific writing projects, but also how to save money.

One of the ways an author can save money is by self-editing before submitting their work to an editor.

The following is an excerpt from Chapter Two of her book Saving Money on Editing & Choosing the Best Editor, which offers helpful advice on that topic.

Self-editing can also save…

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How To Proofread Like A Professional: 5 Tips

Kobo Writing Life

By Joan Selby

As a writer, proofreading your work is one of the most grueling tasks. Most writers (perhaps even the majority of writers) don’t like doing it. Even so, it is a vital part of the entire writing process because this helps you improve your work’s overall result. During this process, you start looking for any grammatical mistakes, spelling or punctuation mistakes. You make sure that you transmit your ideas logically and in a well-defined manner.

Due to recent advances in technology, writers are inclined to use the grammar-checking software. It can ease the entire process, that’s for sure, it can’t be compared to a human proofreader and editor. This kind of software should be used as a complement to the human proofreader, not a replacement.

If you want to skip the proofreading process, you can always hire a professional editor from various services such as BestEssays. This…

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Six Ways To Self-Edit & Polish Your Prose

Kristen Lamb's Blog

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Whether you are new to writing or an old pro, brushing up on the basics is always helpful. Because no matter how GOOD the story is? If the reader is busy stumbling over this stuff, it ruins the fictive dream and she will never GET to the story. So today we are going to cover six ways to self-edit your fiction. Though this stuff might seem like a no-brainer, I see these blunders ALL the time.

….unfortunately even in (legacy) published books.

When I worked as an editor, I found it frustrating when I couldn’t even GET to the story because I was too distracted by these all too common oopses.

There are many editors who charge by the hour. If they’re spending their time fixing oopses you could’ve easily repaired yourself? You’re burning cash and time. Yet, correct these problems, and editors can more easily get to the MEAT…

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Agent perspective: What’s wrong with your manuscript

Carly Watters, Literary Agent Blog

googleimages2Pitching your book to no avail?

Are agents not being forthcoming with advice?

Getting ready to submit in the new year?

The definitive guide to what’s wrong with most manuscripts:

1. All internal conflict, no external conflict. Does more happen in the character’s head than in the plot? This is going to be a problem whether it’s literary or commercial fiction. Make sure enough things happen.

2. Pace. The most important thing to get an agent’s attention is to keep us turning the pages and stop us from doing other things. The moment things lag, you’ve lost us.

3. Voice. This one’s more subjective, but the way to check if your book has voice is whether we can tell the difference between whose head we’re in or who is speaking at any given time. Everything about your writing style needs personality. What makes your book special? Your voice. It’s how…

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