Tag Archives: narrative nonfiction

Creating Tension in Fiction and Memoir

A Writer's Path

by Michael Mohr

One of the toughest things to do in fiction or creative nonfiction writing, in my professional opinion, is to create strong, believable tension. Without tension—between the protagonist and a villain, the protagonist and him/herself, the protagonist and the environment, etc—you really don’t have much of a story. And it’s unlikely readers will want to follow you far through the jungle of your narrative.

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The Idea of a Memoir (Part One)

A writer & her sentimental muse

Photo Credit: Princeton Public Library

The idea or writing a memoir keeps coming to mind time and time again.  Why should I write one?  Who would want to hear my story anyway? And, what the heck the difference between a memoir and autobiography?

I found this that proved quite helpful:

Photo Credit: Susan Calder

And to break it down to the actual characteristics of a memoir:

Photo Credit: Linkedin Slideshare (Click on image for original source)

My next challenge is whatto write about.   So much has happened over the course of my life, I don’t even know where to begin.  I went to my Twitter and started to browse through my tweets for the last year or so and I discovered two tweets where I managed to condense my life down to six words:

Unraveled by losses; rebuilt by love.

———————————–

Life. Just tears in the rain.

The word…

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The Memoir Craze: Thinking of Jumping In?

Memoirs are the current rage. If you have noticed, maybe you are wondering if you should jump in and write one yourself. You aren’t alone. At this writing, over 150,000 titles on Amazon are memoir. Mind boggling. Maybe it’s because more people are now interested in reading memoir, prompting writers to cash in. Or maybe…

via The Memoir Craze: Thinking of Jumping in? — Women Writers, Women’s Books

Ten Genres Defined

Ravenous For Reads

What the heck is a genre? For a word we use so often to describe our taste in music, books, or art, do we know what it means? A genre is a category that we assign depending on focus and style. By organizing tastes into specific genres, we create rules that define whether or not a book, band, or piece of art belongs to that group. If we want to be complicated, these rules also dictate the length of a book, the query letter approach, and, depending on the focus of the book, whether it falls under the traditional genre or a cross-sub genre. In short, genres are labels we apply to distinguish one work of art from another. Today,  I am going to define ten commonly known genres for you.

Fiction versus Nonfiction. This is what we call a no-brainer. Fiction is a work of literature that is entirely…

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The Simple way to Write Non-fiction Creatively

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

Featured Image: Fact and Fiction, Separate but Intertwined


By Peter B. Giblett

According to the Independent Book Publishers Association, the biggest growth areas in books are:

  • Personal development & self-help
  • Religion
  • Biography, autobiography, or memoirs
  • Business
  • Graphic novels

The fact that four out five of these categories are non-fiction suggests there is real growth in this type of writing. Modern audiences are drawn to non-fiction writing. Historically, non-fiction writing was considered boring, but there isn’t any reason it must be. Open any nonfiction work, and the reader should be excited to explore the knowledge the writer is sharing. There are some great stories available, they simply require writing.

Creativeness?

You may know the following, considered one of the great opening sentences in fiction:

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was…

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Three Reasons I Could Stop Writing Memoir But Won’t

BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog

zz ronitBy Ronit Feinglass Plank

I had been writing fiction and wanted to try nonfiction, so I began with personal essays. I didn’t think memoir was for me; in fact I was deliberately avoiding it. I didn’t see a reason to revisit the facts of my confusing childhood and thought memoir wouldn’t be as challenging as creating a world from scratch and putting characters in it. To tell my own story, the story I knew by heart, seemed almost too easy.

I could not have been more wrong. I was about to discover that looking at something you think you know pretty well with fresh eyes and trying to understand it in a new way is definitely not easy. I did try writing several personal essays but the history of how I grew up kept barging in, taking up more and more space. It seemed part of me really wanted to…

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