Tag Archives: mental health

Memoirs of Mental Illness

Apt Reader

Psychology and mental illness are topics that have always interested me. I’ve always wanted to know why people do the things they do and what mental states have caused them to do those things. It’s a wonder that I never went to school for it since I read a lot of books that are either about mental illness or trying to psychoanalyze their choices. Maybe one day I’ll go back to school again for another degree and study it further. Until then, I prefer to read books about it.

Memoirs about mental illness are especially intriguing to me because the people writing them have either gone through the experience themselves or had a family member suffering through it and to read about it on a personal level rather than a professional looking in on it is always pulls me down the rabbit hole.

With that being said, here are some…

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PTSD Survivors: Why is validation so important for healing?

Living in Stigma

dissociation 3

Throughout my years in therapy, validation was comparable to receiving a gift, at times triggering tears of sadness, yet happiness and contentment at the same time.   Finally, someone was not ignoring me, was respecting my feelings and best of all, no interruptions with cruel words.  As a daughter of a narcissistic mother, very rarely showing any validation, empathy and usually telling me “you’re making things up again.”, this was all new to me.

Validation means to express understanding and acceptance of another person’s internal experience, whatever that might be. Validation does not mean you agree or approve. Validation builds relationships and helps ease upset feelings. Knowing that you are understood and that your emotions and thoughts are accepted by others is powerful. Validation is like relationship glue. – psychologytoday.com

This article from PsychCentral.com explains ‘Validation’.

Have you ever wished you could take back an email that you sent when you were…

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The Gifts of Writing a Memoir

Untangled

If you have an itch or a yearning to write your memoir, I encourage you to go for it. Even if you are the only one who reads it, writing your story can bring unimaginable gifts.

Fifteen months ago, I anxiously waited for my memoir, Untangled, A Story of Resilience, Courage, and Triumph to go live on Amazon. What a wonderful, unexpected and humbling time it has been.

I took a huge risk by writing and publishing my memoir. My entire life was focused on keeping quiet, not telling, protecting those I loved, or who loved me. It took me a long time to understand that by keeping quiet, I was actually protecting the people who hurt me in my life. Writing Untangled was a way to announce in a really big way, that I will not keep quiet any longer.

I literally went from telling no one but my therapist…

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The Scars that No One Can See

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Image sourced from: https://www.edvardmunch.org

As a writer, I love reading and writing stories, yet it is listening to other people’s stories which fills me with a sense of wonder.

Ever since I was a child, I’ve always imagined that other people walk around with a massive scroll of inky parchment inside of them, which spills out of their eyes, mouths and hearts whenever they talk about an aspect of their life

Yesterday, I was working with BBC Asian Network on a radio package which has turned out to be one of those experiences which has imprinted itself in my mind and my heart. It was a really emotive and powerful phone-in discussion which saw many people (from all walks of life, backgrounds, religions etc) feel compelled to contact the show to tell their stories.

“Literature, the arts and storytelling are the ultimate expression of what it means  to be a…

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Disassociation and trauma survival

Stockholm Syndrome

Dissociation during violence is a common psychological defence strategy which is activated, for the safety of the victim during distress.

Dissociation can become a primary defence mechanism if you grew up in a dysfunctional, abusive, addictive, or violent home. A child is easily overwhelmed and can check out or dissociate, which helps them to cope with the psychological and emotional overload they are experiencing. This ability to disassociate during conflict as a child, can be a pre-determined conditioning factor, for women and men, who then go on to be abused domestically. Basically, the childhood environment created the foundation for living with, and acceptance of, violence.

Disassociation is similar to amnesia in that is affects the memory. However, unlike amnesia, dissociation is where the person involved is awake but not fully aware. It is similar to daydreaming, where mentally, your not engaged with the environment or what is actually happening. An…

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Keep On Writing

The Write Nook

It’s very easy to stop writing. When you have a few weeks of a hectic schedule, hit a hard writer’s block, or have lost faith that your writing will ever “succeed” it’s easy to quit. Your frustrations and outside pressures cloud your head and sometimes it just easier to give up. You are probably thinking that I am going to tell you not to do this and that you shouldn’t let a few rough days, weeks, or months keep you from completing what you have set out to do. If that’s what you are thinking… you are right! But, I don’t want you to keep writing just so your book, novel, memoir, short story, or poem gets finished. I want you to write because it’s healthy. There are many health “fads” out there right now to help you reach your optimal physical health. There’s Crossfit, obstacle course runs (warrior dashes, mud…

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Welcome to My Breakdown by Benilde Little

Worth the Read

breakdown

The nationally bestselling author of Good Hair and The Itch pens her first book of nonfiction, a “momoir” about her own journey caring for aging parents, raising children, being married, plunging to the depths of depression, and climbing her way out.

My mother was gone. I never thought I would survive her death.

A major bestselling novelist and former magazine editor, long married to a handsome and successful stockbroker with whom she has a beautiful daughter and son, Benilde Little once had every reason to feel on top of the world. But as illness, the aging of her parents, and other hurdles interrupted her seemingly perfect life, she took a tailspin into a pit of clinical depression.

Told in her own fearless and wise voice, Welcome to My Breakdown chronicles a cavern of depression so dark that Benilde didn’t know if she’d ever recover from what David Foster Wallace called…

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