Tag Archives: mental abuse

3 Reasons To Support My #InvisibleScars Emotional Abuse Awareness Campaign

Allow me to introduce myself to some and re-introduce myself to others. My name is Lynette Davis and I’m the author of Even Rain Is Just Water, A Memoir of Rejection, Revelation & Redemption. My memoir is about a lonely little girl looking for love and acceptance that shows how childhood trauma transcends into adulthood and continues to affect survivors.

We’re ten days into a 30-day social campaign called #InvisibleScars, which is approximately one-third of the way.  It’s a campaign to raise awareness about emotional abuse. It began on September 7th and ends on October 7th. This is a matter that is close to me because in my subtitle, the word rejection is i.e. for emotional abuse. One of my commitments upon publishing my story is to help bring more awareness to this insidious type of abuse.

Three reasons to support this campaign:

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First, it’s for a very good cause. By supporting this campaign, you will be helping to raise awareness so that more people can be helped. This type of abuse also produces trauma. Emotional abuse is insidious, that is, it’s gradual and done over and over, over a period of time, and therefore is not easily noticed. It’s so insidious that most people who experience emotional abuse don’t even know they are being emotionally abused. That certainly was true, in my case as well. I did not realize it was abuse until one of my beta readers, upon reading my first draft, responded about the “abuse” I had experienced. “Abuse? What abuse?”

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Secondly, Simply by supporting the #InvisibleScars campaign, you can be the voice on October 7th for countless voiceless victims who have been silenced and feel powerless and defeated due to their chronic or long-term exposure to emotional abuse, for which they have no escape. (On October 7th, we’re going to make one loud thunderous clap so their voices, along with ours, can be heard.) And

 

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Thirdly, It won’t cost you one red cent. That’s right. It doesn’t cost you anything to support this campaign, other than five seconds of your time. And, it’s safe and secure. You’re only giving Thunderclap permission to tweet (Twitter) or post (Facebook or Tumbler) one time, at a designated time. That is all.

Please support this campaign by clicking on:

  • this link:  #InvisibleScars
  • one of the red bars labeled “Twitter,” “Facebook,” or “Tumbler”  

That’s it. You don’t have to do anything else. And on October 7th, we’ll “put emotional abuse on blast!”

Much gratitude to the individuals who have already supported this campaign.

Lynette

 

 

 

 

 

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Emotional Abuse

Make No More Secrets

Whenever we hear or think of the word abuse, what comes to mind is the physical aspect of it. Hitting, punching, scratching, throwing, kicking and everything in between. What people do not realize is that words hurt too. “Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me” is complete bullshit to anyone who has been mentally/emotionally abused in their lifetime. I think that emotional abuse is not talked about much, so I would like to being your attention to this intense topic.

emotional-abuse

Emotional abuse leads to psychological trauma, which includes disorders such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Emotional abuse includes a regular does of “bullying” from another person. Signs of emotional abuse include (liveboldandbloom.com):
– Don’t seem to notice or care about your feelings
– Putting you down, alone or around others
– They make you feel like you are always wrong
– They…

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PTSD - Accepting, Coping, Thriving

This one is tricky.  Hard to pin down since emotions are so volatile and changing with a thought.  How secure you are within yourself makes it harder for someone to abuse you emotionally.  This link is one of those annoying ones that you have to click after every paragraph but the signs are important to be aware of to spot those that use emotion to manipulate others.  http://www.beliefnet.com/wellness/galleries/9-signs-you-are-in-an-emotionally-abusive-relationship.aspx?

  1. You feel like you are on emotional roller coaster.  Another description is you feel like you are walking on egg shells, terrified of the next flair up.
  2. They isolate you.  They don’t want you having contact with friends or family.  This may seem very romantic at first that they want you all to themselves but no one can be your everything.  Family and friendships need to be maintained.  They need other friends too.
  3. Jealousy….not just of other people but your dreams and…

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International Women’s Day and Gaslighting

A Spoonful of Parenting

Today, March 8th 2016, is International Women’s Day. Although we barely recognize it as a holiday in the U.S., apparently it is a big deal in other countries. My daughter is living in Russia, and she has been advised to stay off the streets yesterday and today to protect herself from all the drunken celebrations.

So, in my own way, I’d like to celebrate women (without the drunkenness). One of the best ways I can think of is to empower women who feel they have lost their voice. Who feel they are of no worth. Who are victims in domestic violence.

What happens in the home is the tutor for future generational relationships. There is a strong correlation in research between those who witness or experience abuse during childhood and subsequent violence toward children in adulthood.

Approximately 15.5 million American children living in a 2-parent household are exposed to…

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Self-Love Sunday: Recognizing Emotional Abuse

sunshine and chaos

Most days on the self-love journey, it really is all about you. But, you do have to look at those around you and take a critical look at how they and their actions affect your health and well-being.

Originally, I was going to do a post based on this article from Elephant Journal called I Don’t Have Time to Babysit Your Dysfunctions.

But, as I read and reread the article, I realized the person doing the “talking” in the article is describing what sounded like an emotionally abusive relationship.

If what you read in the Elephant Journal article has you thinking you or someone you know may be emotionally abused, please give the person some of the following information.

**  Please remember, it can dangerous for the person in an abusive relationship to receive information on their computer or phone, a print out or a pamphlet that the abuser can…

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What is the difference between “emotional” and “psychological” abuse?

The Proxy Project

In the struggle and search for answers to the problem of abuse, we encounter the question of what is or is not considered abuse.

One immediate problem for me is that the definition of “emotional” abuse is used synonymously with “psychological” abuse. KP O’Hagan addressed the problem in 1995, in his article in Child Abuse and Neglect.

The confusion of interchangeable use and indistinct definitions arises repeatedly in the literature, as seen yet again in 2012: “There is no universally agreed definition of psychological maltreatment or emotional maltreatment”. Despite two decades of debate and attention, the literature lacks a clear distinction between emotional and psychological abuse.

Is it important to distinguish between emotional and psychological abuse?

For me, yes. I think KP O’Hagan’s distinction is valuable. Emotional abuse, in O’Hagan, involves exactly what it says:Graphic of question marksemotions. This involves how we feel, what we feel, and the…

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For Adult Children of Parents with Narcissistic Personality Disorder

Note: There is a lot of information in this post–a must-read for ACONs and a great source of information for others. However, I do not recommend reading it in one sitting. There’s a lot to absorb.

GentleKindness

I have received a question about the difference between narcissistic abuse parenting and normal healthy parenting. I thought this was a great question and that it should be responded to in a post, so that others could understand about mental abuse of a child with a narcissistic parent.

I have also had conversations with a few of readers lately and the issues of the effects of mentally abusive parenting on adulthood keeps coming up. There are adults who have become aware of mental abuse during their childhood and that is affecting their functionality as adults.

There are also people who are unsure as to whether they experienced any mental abuse as children but seem to having difficulty with issues such as being a perfectionist or carrying some guilt or toxic shame issues.

In order not to  offend any parents let me state the following, This post is not about parenting…

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