Tag Archives: Memoir

Summer Writing Challenge

How many of you have a story to tell? But don’t know where, or even how, to begin? Then, this challenge is for you!

About the 5-Day Memoir Challenge

Get ready. Set. Go! There is a process to writing. And this challenge is about positioning you (in 5 days) to write your memoir, so that you hit the ground running!

How is this challenge different?

What makes this challenge different is the bonus:  When you register for the challenge, you will receive an interactive notebook (eBook) to streamline your writing process, designed to give you a head start to the finish line!

What is a memoir?

Memoir is, first and foremost, a true story. Although it is autobiographical, it is not a biography or an autobiography. Memoir is about sharing a life-changing event. However, it’s more about what you experienced during your life-changing event, than it is about the actual event itself. Memoir validates our experiences and gives us a chance to share our experiences, and therefore, our life lessons.

Join Me

Join me, beginning Monday, June 25th, on Facebook LIVE, for 5 days straight! I know you’re busy. So, I promise to take no more than 20 minutes of your time (unless, of course, you want to stay longer) . I’ll explain the 2 or 3 questions for the day, and answer any questions you may have. And the best part of all, it’s FREE!

Register now!

To register for the 5-Day Memoir Challenge, see the Registration page at http://www.reflectionbooks.org.

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Review: One More Time

Lara's Book Club

carolburnettRecap: Carol Burnett is one of the truly great comedic icons and badass females of her generation and of our time. I was first introduced to her as Miss Hannigan from the original movie version of “Annie,” one of my favorite movies to watch growing up. She was perfect as Miss Hannigan — a villain who was more pathetic than evil, who was hilarious in her awkward gawkiness and who I was glad to see have a happy ending because you knew she wasn’t really a bad person at heart, just a desperate one. Having finally gotten around to reading her memoir from the 1980’s, I’ve come to learn that Carol Burnett was really not that different from the character she played in “Annie.”

She grew up under pretty horrible circumstances, though she didn’t realize as much until she was older. Her parents divorced at a young age and…

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Serious Writers

Joseph N Olsen

Serious writers
Write
No matter what
A shopping list
Becomes an epic memoir
Of a lovers diet
A nutritious kiss
After a home cooked meal
Turns into a sonnet
Serious poets progress
No matter what
A skewed haiku
Becomes a translation
Of the moment
Nature springs forward
Echoing the word count
Of heaven’s might
Serious writers
Write

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The 7 Types of Editing Your Book Needs

A Writer's Path

Stories come in every shape and size, and as an author, you bring your own expertise and experience to your tale. So when it comes to editing, you might not need the same sort of help as someone else.

You might excel at catching grammar problems but struggle with writing the blurb, the back-of-the-book description. You might be great at big-picture analysis but have no idea what to call your finished story.

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Working for the Man, Playing in the Band: My Years with James Brown

bookzone

This is an entertaining book by a guitar player who gets called up to play for James Brown’s band the Soul Generals at a moment’s notice halfway around the world. Damon Wood goes on to chronicle what it’s like to play as a side man for “the hardest working man in show business” for the next 6 years. The good, the bad, and the not so great times of traveling with a large group of musicians, much of the time on a band bus. There were other times spent hustling onto planes to rush to buses then to a venue to barely have time for a sound check, then back to a hotel. to grab a quick shower and iron your costume for the show and relax a bit before going on. But when the music was good it would make you forget all of that stress, especially when James…

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Today’s Writing Tip

Marcha's Two-Cents Worth

laptop-3253347_1280 copy

If your story needs some background information essential to the plot, but it doesn’t involve the main character, you can introduce it by using a prologue. That way you can start Chapter 1 with your protagonist, which you should always do, because it immediately tells your reader who the story is about. Otherwise, they’re going to wonder what happened to the character they “met” first and whose story your book is really about.

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Writing to Give Shape to Our Lives

BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog

zz slavinBy Nancy Slavin

“I write because writing helps bring life into clearer focus and give shape to what I might otherwise experience as disconnected shards.”  – Joyce Thomas

I read the Joyce Thomas quote above in a 2011 issue of Poets & Writers and practically hummed out loud in my attraction to it. The urge to write for me is a primordial need to make sense of experiences that often happen in pieces. The way I make sense of the pieces is by creating the story, which hopefully turns out whole. Certainly in the case my daughter’s birth, the pieces of a fifty-four hour labor are disconnected, fragmenting more and more with each passing year, making me wonder which pieces are important enough to keep? And yet, long as the labor was and as bloody the outcome, I don’t use warfare metaphors to discuss that birth or write about my…

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Creating Tension in Fiction and Memoir

A Writer's Path

by Michael Mohr

One of the toughest things to do in fiction or creative nonfiction writing, in my professional opinion, is to create strong, believable tension. Without tension—between the protagonist and a villain, the protagonist and him/herself, the protagonist and the environment, etc—you really don’t have much of a story. And it’s unlikely readers will want to follow you far through the jungle of your narrative.

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Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

Feminism in Cold Storage

I absolutely loved this memoir written in poetry when I had first read it and wanted to remind everyone of it for this year’s National Poetry Month! I don’t know what you’re reading this April but I highly recommend brown girl dreaming if you haven’t read it yet!

Review:Brown Girl Dreaming - Jacqueline WoodsonI’ve read a lot of memoirs, but none that were done as a series of poems before. It really is a beautiful way to convey your story. My favorite was the first one, about the day she was born.

Woodson brings her birth together with the state of black in America and it’s done masterfully.

I’m not sure how many people can do memoir in this fashion, but this does a better job of explanation some things about the Civil Rights era than almost everything I had to memorize in school. It gives the feeling in the South of black child…

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Recording Your Memories

Writer's Block No More

Try This Technique

By Annette Rey

For the third time in less than a year, a person close to me has died. This has left me feeling fate knocking at my door. For protection from these outer influences I crawl into my writer’s hole and find memoir to be the perfect subject to contemplate.

Take a peek…

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