Tag Archives: Martin Luther King Jr

“March” by John Lewis

chronic bibliophilia

marchtrilogy960x510Alternating between Inauguration Day 2009 and the 1960s, John Lewis, along with co-author Andrew Aydin and Illustrator Nate Powell, tell the story of the civil rights movement through three powerful graphic novels. The trilogy – “March” – follows Lewis from his childhood growing up on a farm in Alabama through his increasing inspiration and involvement in the civil rights movement. Through the stories of protests, sit-ins, the Freedom Ride, the March on Washington, and the signing of the Voting Rights Act, Lewis makes this legendary struggle palpably real and persuasively relevant.

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The “March” trilogy is easily accessible and yet undoubtedly powerful. Its illustrations are stark and evocative; its words are sparse and moving. Each panel advances this gut-wrenching story in a way that makes it clear – this is not just a history lesson. It is a plea for remembrance and a call to action. Published between 2013 and 2016, these novels are timely…

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MLK and Advice for the ACoN Soul

Being a white girl, living in a white neighborhood and not knowing any people of color, Martin Luther King Jr. was never mentioned in my childhood home. His birthday was never celebrated as a holid…

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‘My Time with the Kings’: New Memoir by AP Reporter Recalls Covering MLK and his Family

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ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JAN. 17, 2015 AND THEREAFTER - In this 1968 photo, Coretta Scott King and AP reporter Kathryn Johnson, left, review plans for The King Center during a meeting on the campus of Atlanta University in Atlanta. In a new memoir, "My Life with the Kings: A Reporter's Recollections of Martin, Coretta and the Civil Rights Movement," retired Associated Press reporter Kathryn Johnson describes many civil rights flashpoints that she covered in the 1960s, and details her close relationship with the movement’s leader, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and his family. (AP Photo) ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JAN. 17, 2015 AND THEREAFTER – In this 1968 photo, Coretta Scott King and AP reporter Kathryn Johnson, left, review plans for The King Center during a meeting on the campus of Atlanta University in Atlanta. In a new memoir, “My Life with the Kings: A Reporter’s Recollections of Martin, Coretta and the Civil Rights Movement,” retired Associated Press reporter Kathryn Johnson describes many civil rights flashpoints that she covered in the 1960s, and details her close relationship with the movement’s leader, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and his family. (AP Photo)

In a new memoir, “My Time with the Kings: A Reporter’s Recollections of Martin, Coretta and the Civil Rights Movement,” retired Associated Press reporter Kathryn Johnson describes civil rights flashpoints she covered in the 1960s and details her close relationship with the movement’s leader, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and his family.

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Little Known Black History Fact: Franklin From ‘Peanuts’

Black America Web

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Charles M. Schulz’sPeanuts comic strip remains one of pop culture’s most enduring fixtures, with the cartoonist providing daily and weekly illustrations of Charlie Brown and the gang for nearly five decades.

In the ’60’s, Schulz integrated his comic by introducing its first Black character, Franklin, after a thoughtful letter from a reader. In 1968, shortly after the assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Harriet Glickman, a white woman, wrote Schulz and asked him to consider adding a Black character.

In an exchange of letters, Schulz was reluctant to do so as he didn’t wish to seem like he was patronizing Black people. Glickman was persistent, and shared her exchanges with Black friends to get their input. Glickman continued with her attempts until Schulz finally had a change of heart. Schulz alerted Glickman in a letter to read the strip during the week of July 29.

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Little Known Black History Fact: Freedom Riders

Black America Web

The Freedom Rides were part of a series of protests against the outlawed practice of bus segregation conducted primarily by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE).

The first ride began on May 4, 1961, with a group of “Freedom Riders” leaving Washington, D.C. The Freedom Riders, a collective of Black and White civil rights activists combating Jim Crow laws, were met with persistent violence along their journery.

Even after the historic Morgan v. Virginia (1946) U.S. Supreme Court ruling that made segregating interstate travel illegal, The Deep South held fast to segregation. In 1960, the high court ruled in the Boynton v. Virginia case that segregation at bus stations was also illegal.

College students John Lewis and Bernard Lafayette, both defied the law ahead of the 1960 ruling. Lewis, now a Georgia congressman, later joined CORE’s “Freedom Ride” campaign. The Freedom Riders left D.C. en route to New Orleans for…

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