Tag Archives: marketing

Should You Publish a Second Edition…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

by Stephanie Chandler  on Nonfiction Authors Association Site:

The phrase “now in its second edition” would sound pretty great next to your nonfiction book title, wouldn’t it?

Traditional publishers might suggest a second edition if the first one sells well or if the content changes regularly. Indie authors can decide for themselves when the time is right to do a second, third, or fourth edition of their books.

I recently published a second edition of my book Subscription Marketing. Just over two years had passed since the first publication, but the Subscription Economy moves quickly. Stuff that seemed fresh in 2015 now looked stale. And my opinions have become stronger as I’ve spoken with people after the first edition.

So I took the plunge and updated the book. Along the way, I picked up a few pointers about doing a second edition. Here are the pros and cons, questions to…

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5 Ways to Create an Effective Author Website

Blue-Collar Bookworm

The inflexible reality of the self-publishing boom is that author websites are everywhere. Whether you’re publishing through traditional channels or independently launching your book as the flagship product of a one-person press, you need a website that immediately grabs the casual visitor’s attention—in a good way. Your author website can either mark you as an amateur or exude a clever, market-savvy professionalism that sets you apart from the pack. To ensure the latter effect, follow these five guiding principles.

  1. Match your design to your content. Dayglo color schemes and an author photo that’s been redubbed in pop-art style could work well if your books are gonzo coming-of-age stories, or even social commentary in the breathless style of Tom Wolfe. If your work is literary and your style mostly restrained, a minimalist theme does you justice. If you’re not certain about the impression a given design leaves, test-market it: ask friends…

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13 Things To Do After Publishing Your Next Book – Guest Post by, Toni Pike…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

You have already published your first book. As part of that process, you set up your author pages on Amazon and other distribution sites such as Smashwords. You also established your own website, Facebook author page, Goodreads Author page, Twitter account and accounts on other social media platforms.

Now the time has come to publish your next book. You upload it and, hey presto, a short time later your precious creation goes live. Here is a list of thirteen housekeeping jobs to attend to before beginning the hard work of post-publication marketing.

1. Assemble your Buyer Links

Assemble a list of the new buyer links for adding to your website, signatures and posts.

2. Your Amazon Author Pages

Update your author pages on Amazon USA, UK, France, Germany and Japan: claim the new book and modify your biography.

3. The Author Page on other distribution sites, such as Smashwords

Modify…

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How To Do Goodreads Giveaways (And Why You Should)

CATHERINE RYAN HOWARD

Welcome to the Distress Signals Blogging Bonanza! What’s that, you’re wondering? Well, you can either go and read this post or read the next sentence. In a nutshell: Distress Signals was out in paperback in the UK and Ireland on January 5 and hits the U.S.A. on February 2 (two weeks from today!), and every day in between I’m going to blog as per the schedule at the bottom of this postThursday is for replaying an old post and today I’m replaying this update on Goodreads giveaways from almost exactly a year ago – it was first published on 15 January 2016. But – surprise! – I’ve added a new ranty bit for January 2017. 

Back in August 2014, I blogged about Goodreads giveaways and what I thought was best practice for authors interested in using them as a means of promoting their books [Goodreads Giveaways: Don’t Do…

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The Top 3 Reasons Successful Indie Publishers Have A Business Plan

Kobo Writing Life

By Tonya D. Price

I ask every indie publisher I meet to tell me about their business plan. Most of the authors I talk to admit they don’t have one. Some want to write one, but don’t know where to start. Many believe they don’t need a business plan. But talk to a successful indie publisher and they always have a business plan.

Running a business without a business plan remains one of the biggest mistakes an indie publisher can make. As the indie publishing industry matures, this crucial tool provides a tremendous advantage in a market flooded by self-publishers lacking business experience.

Let’s look at the top three ways a business plan contributes to the success of an indie publishing company:

1. A business plan requires you to decide how you are going to run your company and what you want your company to achieve.

We all have some…

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Why Authors Need to Be as Accessible as Possible

A Writer's Path

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by Katie McCoach

As an author today, you know that every reader is valuable. You love your readers; you want to keep the ones who are loyal and reach new ones. That’s what promotion and growing a business is all about – reaching new consumers.

That’s why it’s so important for authors to be as accessible to readers as possible.The easier a reader can find you and buy your books, the easier it will be to reach wider audiences.

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