Tag Archives: life stories

#IndieAuthor Friday Allen Long #Memoirs

Books and Such

It’s Friday!!!!!  Today’s indie author is Allen Long, here with his memoir, Less ThanHuman.  It’s received positive reviews, with one Amazon reviewer stating the ‘….writing style is unique in that in draws the reader in, tells of sadness experienced by the author, but has an undertone of triumph and joy.’

“In Less than Human,” Allen Long tells the story of his often nightmarish childhood in the wealthy suburbs of D.C., the wonders and mysteries of teenage love, his ill-advised journeys into corporate America and a hellish marriage, and ultimate breakdown. And yet, his story is mostly one of triumph. He draws strength from the joys of fatherhood, he finds true love in his second marriage, and through working with psychotherapists and leading a life rich in self-examination, he overcomes both child abuse and the resulting PTSD, finally learning that instead of being less than… he is, indeed… human.

“Less than…

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there once was an autobiography . . .

Nancy Chadwick, Memoir Writer

x4thblvdkicks-jpg-pagespeed-ic-ccvycxw7nfI had an autobiography. I wanted a memoir.

After years of chronicling my life experiences from girlhood to teens to adulthood, I had an autobiography. However, “One’s autobiography does not a memoir make!” I proclaimed in my essay, “I Called You a Memoir” published in the Magic of Memoir. I shared what I most remembered from my girlhood–white anklet socked feet fitting snuggly in red Mary Janes, wearing a navy dress, patterned in tiny white polka dots with an appliqué of paint brushes and an artist’s palette in primary colors at the hem–while posing for a photo on my first day of kindergarten. And I remembered marking my teen years with shaving my legs and applying makeup while undisturbed in the private confines of the upstairs bathroom. I accepted my adulthood in college, my first job at Leo Burnett advertising and subsequent jobs in advertising before moving on to work…

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Writing a memoir: what are the benefits?

Lyn Alderson

woman-41201_1280Should you write a memoir, and what are the benefits of such a project?

I’ve been thinking this through while ghost writing two very different memoirs for ladies who both have fascinating stories.

These women are inspirational characters who have given a lot to other people, and they both have great insights: the world needs to hear what they have to say.

So think about whether you have a great story that will benefit others when they read it. You don’t need to be famous or wealthy, although you might be. But you do need an eventful life story, one that involves overcoming challenges, or triumphing over adversity.

The best and the worst memoirs

In the best memoirs I’ve read, people have reflected on- and owned up to- their mistakes as human beings and found a positive way forward despite what life has thrown at them. The worst memoirs are the…

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Connecting the Chapters of Our Lives – Guest Post by, Cynthia Reyes…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

(Or: The glue that holds your Memoir together)

Licence to use obtained – Copyright: gmm2000 / 123RF Stock Photo

Not everyone writes their memoir in a chronological order. Often, we write as we remember. But once we’ve written some or all of the chapters of our lives, we find ourselves with a puzzle. What we have is a bunch of stories without a main thread tying them together into one journey.

How to put some order on the disorder? Make a single narrative out of the wonderful chaos of our memories?

Here are 6 tips to help you transform what you’ve written into one story — the powerful story of your remarkable life.

1: My first suggestion: Leave it, then Re-read it. This time, you’re looking for the theme/s and progression of your story. Try this process:

  1. Put the manuscript aside; leave it alone for some days.
  2. Now reread,

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The Importance of Finding Your Niche

Marketing Christian Books

I recently spoke with a new Member of Christian Small Publishers Association (CSPA) who has produced a book on forgiveness. We were speaking of the importance of knowing who the target audience is for his book.

This gentleman told me that all Christians were his audience. After all, every Christian needs to forgive since it is commanded in the Bible.

I wholeheartedly agree. Every Christian does need to forgive. However, not every Christian currently needs information or help with forgiveness and some are not yet ready to entertain the idea of forgiving. Additionally, this author’s voice will not resonate with everyone.

As more and more books are published, competition escalates. For example, doing a search of “forgiveness” in books on Amazon reveals 31,399 results. That is a lot of books on forgiveness that Christians have to choose from.

How does this author compete with 31,399 other titles on forgiveness? He…

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Denouement

WITT BITS

DFriends often beg me to write my memoir. I usually respond with something like, “there’s no resolution so why write it?” As I continue to work on this memoir I begin to see why it is important to finish it. It is not to write the best seller, gain notoriety or get rich. It is to leave something of myself behind and find the denouement within me.

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