Tag Archives: indie writers

Should You Publish a Second Edition…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

by Stephanie Chandler  on Nonfiction Authors Association Site:

The phrase “now in its second edition” would sound pretty great next to your nonfiction book title, wouldn’t it?

Traditional publishers might suggest a second edition if the first one sells well or if the content changes regularly. Indie authors can decide for themselves when the time is right to do a second, third, or fourth edition of their books.

I recently published a second edition of my book Subscription Marketing. Just over two years had passed since the first publication, but the Subscription Economy moves quickly. Stuff that seemed fresh in 2015 now looked stale. And my opinions have become stronger as I’ve spoken with people after the first edition.

So I took the plunge and updated the book. Along the way, I picked up a few pointers about doing a second edition. Here are the pros and cons, questions to…

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Why Pinterest May Be The Greatest Website For Writers

A Writer's Path

by Teagan Berry

There are countless social media sites out on the internet, each of them offering us different means to share our thoughts and life with other people. For authors, social media can help us out in many different ways. Book promotion, connecting with fans, networking with other authors… and that’s just to name a few.

A little while ago I was introduced to a site called Pinterest by a fellow author and let me tell you, I will be forever grateful to her for it. In this post, along with another one I shall be putting up in a couple days, I hope to give you a few reasons why I believe Pinterest is so useful for authors. Right now, I’m going to focus on the private side of Pinterest, and what it can do for you and your specific writing.

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Writers: Why You Need to Learn How to Give a Good Critique

A Writer's Path

by Mary Kate Pagano

I’ve written before about where to find critique partners but I wanted to touch on something just as important…

… namely why you should be a good critique partner yourself.

A good critique partner is an incredible asset. And I don’t believe they’re made overnight. Learning how to give useful, good critique is a skill that you develop over time. And it’s an important one, as a writer.

Why?

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Review of Green-Light Your Book by Brooke Warner

Author S. Smith

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In April I attended the IBPA PubU in Portland. More about that event here.  Included in our free tote bag with the regular goodies of pens, notepads, etc., was the book, Green-Light Your Bookby Brooke Warner of She Writes Press.

I read the book pretty quickly, but unfortunately didn’t write the review right away. As I look through it now, checking my underlines and attempting to write this review, I realize I could write several pages, much too long for a blog post. I’ll do my best to condense.

First, I really enjoyed Green-Light. Although it seemed meant for the person who has just finished their first manuscript and is still “waiting to be published,” as someone who’s already published several novels, I still found Green-Light to be thought-provoking, inspiring, and contain some useful info (for example, the section on the advantage of forming an LLC).

Anyone…

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Creative Writing as Therapy: How Can Writing Help?

Welcome to Writerly Online

creativetherapy

Therapy can take many forms, and creative types of therapy are growing in popularity. The Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada integrates Music Therapy and Art Therapy as essential parts of the healing experience for kids staying in the hospital, as do many other hospitals including the Children’s Hospital Colorado, Children’s Hospital Philadelphia, and the Boston Children’s Hospital.

You don’t need a therapist, an art teacher, or a writing coach to use writing as a form of therapy for yourself. For this type of self-healing, you are completely in control. You never have to share your writing with anyone – in fact, you can burn it when you’re finished if you like.

Writing, whether autobiographical or fictional, allows us to imagine how a scenario might play out. Truth is stranger than fiction, and scenes from our own lives can end up in the middle of our…

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Author Interview Seventy-Eight – T.R Robinson Autobiography

Library of Erana

Welcome to Tanya (Who writes under the author name of T. R. Robinson.

Please tell us a little about your writing – for example genre, title, etc.

So far I have only written autobiographical books.  The first two in my new abridged, dialogue based series are: ‘Tears of Innocence’ and ‘Negative Beauty’.

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Where do you find inspiration?

People often told me about themselves and their experiences, frequently in confidence.  In listening to them I came to realise how different and dramatic were the lives of my grandparents, parents and my own.

Do you have a favourite character? If so why?

My mother who I unfortunately lost at an early age.  She was one of the most loving and caring people to have walked this earth.  These are not just my own sentiments; many who had known her told me, even many years later, how beautiful she was not just…

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