Tag Archives: indie publishers

InDesign Beginner’s Cheat Sheet: Part 3

Just Can't Help Writing

It’s time to put final elements together before producing a pdf suitable for submission to Ingram and CreateSpace. Most important at this final stage is your “front matter.”

Front Matter

This term refers to your title page(s), your copyright page, and any other elements you want to include, such as quotes from reviews or blurbs you’ve solicited, epigraphs like quotes from poems or songs, or an author’s note—everything leading up to the actual first page of Chapter One.

To begin, determine how many front matter pages you want. I’ve discovered that, except for the copyright page, most published books insert front-matter text only on odd-numbered pages, or the right-hand pages. So in my books, I include the following front matter pages:

  • Page 1: A “Praise for” page of quotes from editorial reviews
  • Page 2: Blank
  • Page 3: Title (return) by (return) Author, all centered
  • Page 4: Copyright page (see discussion…

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InDesign Beginner’s Cheat Sheet: Part 2

Just Can't Help Writing

Three books fanned open from aboveIn this post, some final InDesign formatting must- and should-dos as you prepare to create the pdf of your print edition for proofing and upload to Ingram and CreateSpace.

Click images for larger versions. Click here for a complete list of posts in the InDesign Beginner’s Cheat Sheet series.

Removing Master Formatting from Chapter Opening Pages

The experts in book-design informed me that the opening page of each chapter should NOT display the formatting I incorporated into the masters that control the appearance of each page. In other words, no page numbers, no running heads.

A chapter-opening page with running heads not removed The running heads and page numbers need to be removed from this pags. (Note that this spread is selected in the Pages panel to the left.)

Fortunately, it’s easy to remove these.

Select a chapter-opening page in the Pages panel by clicking on it. If you want to see that particular page on your…

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Nine Strategies to Promote your Writing Locally

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

By Jessica Mcneil

Do you ever wonder what happens once an author has their first ever title created and presses the ‘Publish’ button? You may not be a New York Times best-selling author, you may not become famous immediately, and your Amazon numbers may be awful, but does this mean that you should quit writing books? Absolutely Not!

No matter what kind of book you compile, success in self-publishing is all about discoverability, especially if you want to reach your target audience. Listed below are a couple of low-cost strategies that you could put into use to ensure that you achieve the kind of visibility and popularity your writing deserves.

Nine ideas may seem a bit overwhelming, but keep in mind that you only have to put them into practice one at a time. When the expected results come to pass, you will have secured a direct connection to a vast…

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The Top 3 Reasons Successful Indie Publishers Have A Business Plan

Kobo Writing Life

By Tonya D. Price

I ask every indie publisher I meet to tell me about their business plan. Most of the authors I talk to admit they don’t have one. Some want to write one, but don’t know where to start. Many believe they don’t need a business plan. But talk to a successful indie publisher and they always have a business plan.

Running a business without a business plan remains one of the biggest mistakes an indie publisher can make. As the indie publishing industry matures, this crucial tool provides a tremendous advantage in a market flooded by self-publishers lacking business experience.

Let’s look at the top three ways a business plan contributes to the success of an indie publishing company:

1. A business plan requires you to decide how you are going to run your company and what you want your company to achieve.

We all have some…

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Barnes & Noble to Start a Print Book Self-Pub Option?

This would definitely be a game changer!

Just Can't Help Writing

Woman in dress and hat sitting on books and working on laptop

Check out this article from Digital Book World about a new venture at Barnes and Noble to allow self-published writers to offer print versions in B&N venues, hopefully a step that will help keep them afloat. Chime in with your views on whether this new option is worth a look.

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