Tag Archives: indie authors

Just Write! Stop Waiting for the Good Stuff

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

By: Marilyn L. Davis

“A day of bad writing is always better than a day of no writing.” ― Don Roff

When I think of peoples’ job titles and descriptions, I get an idea of what they do every day.

  • Counselor? They listen to people talk about their problems, help them find solutions, and, well, counsel.
  • Artist? They draw, paint, and create, well, art.
  • Welder? They join metals together, fusing, compressing, and well, welding materials together.
  • Writer? Well, duh, they write.

I’ve said before that I have a hard time thinking of other professions where people are allowed to say, “I’m not feeling it.” Oh, maybe they say it, but they show up anyway. We writers, on the other hand, can avoid the pen/paper/computer/laptop and find umpteen reasons not to sit and write.

I think one of the poorest excuses we give ourselves is that we don’t have anything good…

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Working With Formatters

Lit World Interviews

Quite a few of my clients have come to me to have their books formatted, and then found themselves unable to update their already published works with their latest releases because they don’t have the formatted Word manuscripts on file. That’s fine if the formatter who worked on your previous books is available to do the updates. Hopefully the formatter is still in business and findable, or even alive. Things happen. If you have the formatted manuscripts, either your current formatter, or yourself, can do the updates in minutes and have the incarnations required by the various publishing platforms quickly. If you don’t then you either leave them as they are minus any future updates or have whatever manuscripts that you do have on file reformatted, which is a waste of money.

When hiring people to work on your book, here are a few things to take note of before…

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Top Five Reasons to Self-Publish

theherdlesswitch

Every writer now days has to carefully decide between two roads, traditional publishing, or self-publishing. Both roads, with the proper amount of elbow grease, will technically get you where you really want to be, but both roads are far from equal.

I must confess that just like every other writer out there I started out wanting to go the traditional publishing route. Once I finished my work I even started querying publishers. That was a whole new level for me, it helped me to see what it was really like to compete for a coveted spot on some publishers roster. That was when I realized I wanted to take a crack at self-publishing. Here are my top five reasons for making that decision.

I wish you the best of luck, whichever route you decide to take!

1: Time: I’m sure you’ve heard the old saying, ‘time is money’. So true…

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InDesign Beginner’s Cheat Sheet: Part 3

Just Can't Help Writing

It’s time to put final elements together before producing a pdf suitable for submission to Ingram and CreateSpace. Most important at this final stage is your “front matter.”

Front Matter

This term refers to your title page(s), your copyright page, and any other elements you want to include, such as quotes from reviews or blurbs you’ve solicited, epigraphs like quotes from poems or songs, or an author’s note—everything leading up to the actual first page of Chapter One.

To begin, determine how many front matter pages you want. I’ve discovered that, except for the copyright page, most published books insert front-matter text only on odd-numbered pages, or the right-hand pages. So in my books, I include the following front matter pages:

  • Page 1: A “Praise for” page of quotes from editorial reviews
  • Page 2: Blank
  • Page 3: Title (return) by (return) Author, all centered
  • Page 4: Copyright page (see discussion…

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InDesign Beginner’s Cheat Sheet: Part I

Just Can't Help Writing

This is Part 9 of my “InDesign Beginner’s Cheat Sheet” series. You can follow the links at the bottom of this post to check out the whole series, from opening a file in InDesign to formatting.

In this post: Part 1 of some follow-up moves you can and should make in InDesign as you format your POD book interior.

***CLICK ON THE IMAGES TO SEE FULL-SIZED VERSIONS***

Creating Additional Styles for Chapter Titles and Numbers

Just like Word, InDesign works best if you create a style for each element you use often and apply that style consistently across chapters. So you need a style for whatever elements—for example, chapter names—that you plan to include.

Create these additional styles exactly as you created your original main body style.

  • Select the text you want to style, for example a chapter title.
  • Format it to look the way you want.
  • Click “Create New…

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Nine Strategies to Promote your Writing Locally

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

By Jessica Mcneil

Do you ever wonder what happens once an author has their first ever title created and presses the ‘Publish’ button? You may not be a New York Times best-selling author, you may not become famous immediately, and your Amazon numbers may be awful, but does this mean that you should quit writing books? Absolutely Not!

No matter what kind of book you compile, success in self-publishing is all about discoverability, especially if you want to reach your target audience. Listed below are a couple of low-cost strategies that you could put into use to ensure that you achieve the kind of visibility and popularity your writing deserves.

Nine ideas may seem a bit overwhelming, but keep in mind that you only have to put them into practice one at a time. When the expected results come to pass, you will have secured a direct connection to a vast…

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10 Questions to Ask Before Signing with a Small Press Publisher (Part One)

Writers After Dark

Small press publishing has become a significant cottage industry. Self-publishing changed the book industry’s dynamics, and as many of the large traditional publishers struggled to make profits and maintain relevance, many entrepreneurs saw an opportunity to fill a void. Not burdened by high overhead or restricted by antiquated publishing practices, small press companies have the benefits of agility and flexibility.

For many authors, a small press publishing contract offers a nice “middle ground” between being on their own as an Indie author and the long, often pointless process of courting a major publisher. Understandably, a book contract offers both excitement and a sense of “approval” or acceptance. In short, for some writers, “I’ve been published” feels more legitimate than “I’ve published.” And for those authors not interested in learning about marketing, publishing, sales, editing services, and all the other mechanics that make up “publishing,” a small press can alleviate the…

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