Tag Archives: indie authors

When It’s Time To Stop Auditioning, Give Yourself the Job: Self/Hybrid Publish

| Rock+Paper+Music |

Let me start with a disclaimer: this is not a screed against traditional publishing. Yes, those are trendy and you’ll find lots of them out there, but this is not one. Life has taught me that when something sustains as long as traditional publishing has, it’s because it remains, however confounded and confused, a vital player in the scheme of things. I’d say that’s the case with the Big 5.

This is, instead, a few of my cobbled thoughts on the topic of why one might choose otherwise; why one might self-publish, or hybrid publish, or publish outside the realm of that iconic process of securing an agent who’ll, hopefully, wrangle a publishing deal, that will, hopefully, vaunt you into the stratosphere of big awards and New York Times bestseller lists. As much as one might dream of that starry-eyed path to literary greatness, there are myriad reasons why one might choose…

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Taking Pride in Amateur Mistakes

Tara Lee Davis -- A story begins one word at a time

My grandfather had an eighth grade education, yet that never stopped him from being a lifelong student. If he didn’t know how to do something, he taught himself through books and hands-on work. My memories are filled with images of him bent under the hood of a car, hunched over a workbench in his cellar workshop, and kneeling in the dirt planting flowers.

Nothing was an obstacle (except maybe that low-hanging basement pipe, but he put thick foam padding around that after he almost knocked himself out).

He laid tracks for the railroad during the week and, in his off hours, worked in the house: putting up wallpaper, repairing plumbing, tiling a shower, building cabinets, hemming pants, fixing broken toys, taking apart a electronics, laying bricks, and fiddling with new-fangled gadgets.  When mobile phones were still the size of an arm, he installed a mount in his car and made…

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How to Get a Book Club to Review Your Book

In the digital age of Kindles and other e-readers, you might think that book clubs have gone the way of any other non-virtual interaction. I can personally assure you that you are wrong…Pistils was selected by at least two book clubs (that I know of) as a featured read. Considering it was our first venture […]

via How to Get a Book Club to Pick You! — Twintype Books LLC


Why You Need an Author Profile – And Where to Post It

One of my hugely informative author profiles. Don’t do this. Author profiles are an essential part of book marketing and promotion. An a…

Source: Why You Need an Author Profile – And Where to Post It


How to Spark Your Story With an Inciting Incident

First Edition Design Publishing - a hybrid publisher

If you are planning on writing a story, there is something you need to consider besides basic plot structure. You need to determine your Inciting Incident.

What incident will compel your protagonist to act?

What Is an Inciting Incident?

I am reading The Story Grid by Shawn Coyne and Story by Robert McGee to learn how to write a compelling story. Both Coyne and McGee emphasize the importance of writing a compelling inciting incident.

To incite means to stir, encourage, or urge on; to stimulate or prompt to action.

An inciting incident, then, is an event that forces your protagonist to act, compelling them to stop sitting around and do something.

Shawn Coyne has this to say about inciting incidents:

No matter the unit of story (beat, scene, sequence, act, or global Story) what the inciting incident must do is upset the life balance of your lead protagonist/s. It must make them…

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WRITE 1,000 WORDS EVERY DAY: Create a Writing Schedule

Matthew Howard

Write 1,000 words every day. It might be the best writing advice I ever got. Yes, we can learn much about the craft of writing, about style and narrative structure and how to research. But to be a writer, you need to write.

1,000 words per day is an easy goal. Professional writers commit to more—even much more. But if you have other commitments in life besides writing, set a goal where you can under-promise and over-deliver. I often start a daily 1,000 and end up with 2,500. I got on a roll one weekend and drafted a 10,000-word story in two days.

The 1,000-word goal keeps the pump primed for great days like those. If it’s difficult at first, it gets easier when you stick to it! How long does it take to reach 1,000 words? If the project requires intense planning, plotting, or thinking about complex material…

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Perseverance: My Word for 2018 by Lynette Davis

Patricia Ann Bridewell

My word for 2018 is perseverance—the ability to go on when things seem hopeless or when you don’t know how everything is going to turn out. As a writer and published author, I’ve learned that there are no guarantees in the business of writing, publishing and especially marketing. The odds are simply better in some situations than others. As writers and authors, it’s up to us to find out where the odds work best for us. And for that, we need perseverance. It takes perseverance to continue to forge ahead, day after day, week after week and month after month, toward our goals and ultimately—our dreams.

As you probably know, dreams are not obtained overnight, especially in the publishing world. Our dreams begin when we set literary goals and then put all our efforts into those goals—for a desired result. As writers, it’s nearly impossible to achieve any type…

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