Tag Archives: history

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson (YA)

SKB'S BOOK NOOK

Brown Girl Dreaming

Brown Girl Dreaming has become one of my favourite books of all time!

The memoir centers around Jacqueline Woodson’s early life growing up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s in the United States. Written in verse form, Woodson shares her experiences of being born in Ohio, and growing up between South Carolina and Brooklyn, New York, and trying to find her identity and place in the world. Each page is a short poem about an experience from her life or the history of her family or the events that were occurring at that moment in time. The poems are simple, emotionally charged, and beautiful. This is not a difficult read at all.

The reason this novel has become a favourite is because there are aspects of Woodson’s life that I can relate to, especially the struggle to fit into two places that she calls home…

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Yecheilyah’s Book Reviews – Even Rain is Just Water: A Memoir of Rejection, Revelation & Redemption by Lynette Davis

The PBS Blog

Title: Even Rain is Just Water: A Memoir of Rejection, Revelation & Redemption

Author: Lynette Davis

Print Length: 296 pages

Publisher: Reflections Books; 1 edition (May 30, 2017)

Publication Date: May 30, 2017

Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC

Language: English

ASIN: B071DC83TN

*I received this book as a gift from the author*

When I first read the title of this book, I knew that I would read it. With a powerful statement, as Even Rain is Just Water it had to be good. I was not disappointed. Lynette Davis gives us a riveting account of her life as the victim of emotional abuse at the hands of someone who is to be a girl’s first teacher, supporter, and motivator. Her mother.

The testimony switches back and forth between Lyn’s experiences as a child and as an adult, both of which include some form of emotional abuse and neglect. Lyn’s…

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Encouraging Activism: A Conversation with Rodney L. Hurst Sr.

K E Garland

Rodney L. Hurst Sr. has worked as a civil right activist for sixty-one years. His initial involvement with NAACP’s youth council led him to organize sit-ins at several downtown Jacksonville, Florida lunch counters during the 60s and 70s. The fight for equality and the subsequent and infamous Ax Handle Saturday are detailed in his memoir, It Was Never about a Hot Dog and a Coke®!

On May 26th Mr. Hurst and I discussed civil rights and advocacy. Unfortunately, his words are still timely.

KG:     Your book describes racial oppression and police brutality from decades ago. Has anything changed?

RH:     No.

KG:     Nothing at all?

RH:     I mean based on what we’re seeing today, we had instances of police brutality years ago, back in the 50s and 60s. We did not have pictures and videos. So, it was your word against ours. And they were agents of…

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Tulsa Riot of 1921: The Destruction of Black Wall Street

Today marks the 95th anniversary of the Tulsa Riot of 1921 and the destruction of many homes and businesses in the Greenwood district (also referred to as “Little Africa” and “Black Wall Street”) of Tulsa, Oklahoma. In the early 1920’s, Tulsa was wealthy on account of an oil discovery; and because of this, the Greenwood district, a predominately African-American area, flourished. It was one of the most affluent Black-owned commercial areas of the 1900s. The White community in the surrounding areas were unaccepting of economic success of “Black Wall Street.”[1]

On March 31st 1921, a young man by the name of Dick Rowland was accused of assaulting Sarah Page, a 17 year old white elevator operator. This incident was further instigated by newspapers as they encouraged the public to hang Rowland. When the Black community heard about the potential hanging, over 50 armed African-American men came to…

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Historical Tidbits for Memorial Day

Live to Write - Write to Live

It is Memorial Day in the U.S. today. A day where we focus on remembering the men and women who have given their lives in military service protecting our freedoms.

Some of the history includes:

On May 1, 1865 in Charleston, SC, to honor 257 dead Union Soldiers who had been buried in a mass grave in a Confederate prison camp (Race Course prison camp which later became Hampton Park), former slaves dug up the bodies and worked for 2 weeks to give them a proper burial as gratitude for fighting for their freedom.

They then held a parade of 10,000 people led by 2,800 black children where they marched, sang, and celebrated.

MemorialDay1865

Link to the photo and some more information

Here’s an interesting article by Brian Hicks in The Post and Courier for more information on the stories behind the first Memorial Day.

And a link to Snopes for good…

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What We Learn When Writing a Memoir

Terry Baker Mulligan

Recently, when a neighbor’s son started medical school, he told me he would have to learn 15,000 new words in the next four years. What I found most interesting was that as a college graduate, his vocabulary already consisted of approximately 15,000 words.

UnknownAlthough I don’t have a precise number of new terms, skills or techniques I mastered during my memoir writing process, I mention this young man’s experience because it reminds me of the steep learning curve I climbed while writing my book.

Most people take a few years, maybe even ten, to write a book. My memoir, Sugar Hill Where the Sun Rises Over Harlem describes growing up in Harlem from approximately 1952-1962. I first started working on the book in 1974 when my memory of Harlem’s mid-century transitions, and mine, was still vivid. I finally finished it in 2011. Sugar Hill was published in 2012.

That’s exceedingly…

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