Tag Archives: freedom riders

Freedom Riders: It wasn’t about race, it was about rights

The trailer is powerful!!! but not for the faint at heart.

A Melange of Musings

The 1961 Freedom Rides, organized by CORE, were modeled after the organization’s 1947 Journey of Reconciliation. During the 1947 action, African-American and white bus riders tested the 1946 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Morgan v. Virginia that segregated bus seating was unconstitutional. The 1961 Freedom Rides sought to test a 1960 decision by the Supreme Court in Boynton v. Virginia that segregation of interstate transportation facilities, including bus terminals, was unconstitutional as well. A big difference between the 1947 Journey of Reconciliation and the 1961 Freedom Rides was the inclusion of women in the later initiative. In both actions, black riders traveled to the American South–where segregation continued to occur–and attempted to use whites-only restrooms, lunch counters and waiting rooms.

http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/freedom-rides

freedomriders_map.GIF

Before we go any further I want y’all to think about that. Black and White, men and women, got on a bus to drive deep into the South…

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Little Known Black History Fact: Freedom Riders

Black America Web

The Freedom Rides were part of a series of protests against the outlawed practice of bus segregation conducted primarily by the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE).

The first ride began on May 4, 1961, with a group of “Freedom Riders” leaving Washington, D.C. The Freedom Riders, a collective of Black and White civil rights activists combating Jim Crow laws, were met with persistent violence along their journery.

Even after the historic Morgan v. Virginia (1946) U.S. Supreme Court ruling that made segregating interstate travel illegal, The Deep South held fast to segregation. In 1960, the high court ruled in the Boynton v. Virginia case that segregation at bus stations was also illegal.

College students John Lewis and Bernard Lafayette, both defied the law ahead of the 1960 ruling. Lewis, now a Georgia congressman, later joined CORE’s “Freedom Ride” campaign. The Freedom Riders left D.C. en route to New Orleans for…

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