Tag Archives: editing

How To Proofread Like A Professional: 5 Tips

Kobo Writing Life

By Joan Selby

As a writer, proofreading your work is one of the most grueling tasks. Most writers (perhaps even the majority of writers) don’t like doing it. Even so, it is a vital part of the entire writing process because this helps you improve your work’s overall result. During this process, you start looking for any grammatical mistakes, spelling or punctuation mistakes. You make sure that you transmit your ideas logically and in a well-defined manner.

Due to recent advances in technology, writers are inclined to use the grammar-checking software. It can ease the entire process, that’s for sure, it can’t be compared to a human proofreader and editor. This kind of software should be used as a complement to the human proofreader, not a replacement.

If you want to skip the proofreading process, you can always hire a professional editor from various services such as BestEssays. This…

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How to do a developmental edit yourself

John Robin's Blog

Friday is here again, which means another blog post from me!

Today I’m following up on last week’s post on the importance of developmental editing, by popular request, with a how-to for writers who want to try and do it themselves. (If you missed last week’s post, read it here.)

Meanwhile, on our blog, I hope you enjoyed this week’s post from Byron Gillan, on magic and environment in fantasy (read it here) and Sean Gallagher’s great post on his own magic in the world of Mysts (read it here). Next month, we’ll be talking about what inspires us to write the fantasy stories we write, so stay tuned for that.

Before I dive into the how-to, I want to announce something exciting that I’m starting next Friday. World Builders 3.0!

For those who followed the World Builders series, this started with the original world builders (read…

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Laurie Easter

janna-3My introduction to Janna Marlies Maron came when my essay “Something to Do with Baldness” was accepted for publication at Under the Gum Tree, a reader supported, full-size, quarterly literary arts magazine that specializes in creative nonfiction, with visual artwork and photo essays alongside feature essays and four regular department sections: Fork and Spoon, Soundtrack, 24 Frames a Second, and Stomping Ground. Janna is the editor and publisher of Under the Gum Tree, which she began five years ago with the publication of the first issue in August of 2011.

Under the Gum Tree was my first creative nonfiction print publication in the January 2014 issue, and I was ecstatic when I received my copy, which has gorgeous artwork by Jane Ryder. utgt-cover-jan-2014The magazine is printed on high quality paper with a thick card-stock cover and the pages have that slick coffee table-display feel. I couldn’t believe my…

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The Most Common Editing and Proofreading Mistakes That Writers Usually Make

Kobo Writing Life

By Gloria Kopp

In today’s marketplace, getting your work out there is often considered more crucial than checking it for errors first. As good as it feels to be the first with a new story, though, it’s embarrassing when readers pick up on the mistakes you made in your haste to get published. Here’s the most common errors writers make when proofreading and editing, and how to avoid them.

Getting too familiar with the content

Have you actually read over your writing and decided it looks fine, only to spot a glaring error once it’s gone live? It’s thanks to your brain filling in the gaps in your writing without you knowing it. For example, if you write the word ‘liaise’ but actually mistype it as ‘liase’, your brain will fill in the missing ‘i’ for you, meaning you miss the spelling error.

The best way around this is to make…

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Six Ways To Self-Edit & Polish Your Prose

Kristen Lamb's Blog

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Whether you are new to writing or an old pro, brushing up on the basics is always helpful. Because no matter how GOOD the story is? If the reader is busy stumbling over this stuff, it ruins the fictive dream and she will never GET to the story. So today we are going to cover six ways to self-edit your fiction. Though this stuff might seem like a no-brainer, I see these blunders ALL the time.

….unfortunately even in (legacy) published books.

When I worked as an editor, I found it frustrating when I couldn’t even GET to the story because I was too distracted by these all too common oopses.

There are many editors who charge by the hour. If they’re spending their time fixing oopses you could’ve easily repaired yourself? You’re burning cash and time. Yet, correct these problems, and editors can more easily get to the MEAT…

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Proofreading Top 10 checklist

suzanne rogerson fantasy author

Proofreading is one of the hardest stages of writing for me. I love drafting and editing, but to read each word and sentence and analyse it’s components is difficult. It’s too scientific for my creative brain, but an important process that needs to be done before considering publication.

Back in August last year, I devised a checklist to tackle the final proofread of Visions of Zarua. My original post was here.

Looking back, I’m quite pleased with it as a ‘how to’ guide. It worked brilliantly for me, but I do have to warn you that a couple of tiny errors still slipped past this stage (slap wrist). Luckily with KDP & Createspace it’s a simple matter of updating the corrected file and within 24 hours the revised book is on sale. However, we should all aim to produce the best book we possibly can from the start and there really is no…

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