Tag Archives: editing

How Working with a Critique Group Can Improve Your Manuscript

I wrote my first four novels without any outside input up to the point when I sent the second draft to a small group of pre-readers, made more changes and then on to my editor. Then I moved home from London to the English south coast and started work on novel number five, which became…

via How Working with a Critique Group can Improve your Manuscripts — Women Writers, Women’s Books


Which Kind(s) of Editing Does Your Novel Need?

A Writer's Path


Notice the title of this post is not Does your novel need editing? The answer to that question is YES. Always. I don’t care if you wrote The Great Gatsby of the modern day; your novel needs to be edited.

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The Five Stages Of Revising Your Novel

Kobo Writing Life

By Lisa M. Lilly

You’ve finished a first draft of your novel. Now what?

If you’re like most writers (including me), your draft includes points that require more research, scenes that trail off, plot holes, or all of the above.

Addressing every issue at once is overwhelming. The five steps below can organize and speed up your revision process.

Step One: Start With The Story

Once you’ve let your novel sit for at least a week, read it all the way through. Focus on your plot, asking yourself:

  • Is there conflict on page one?
  • Does the plot turn in a significant way at each quarter point in the novel?
  • Is your protagonist actively pursuing her goals?
  • Does your antagonist strenuously oppose your protagonist?
  • Does tension increase as the story progresses?
  • Do the events logically flow from one another?
  • Does your climax resolve the major plot issues and pay off emotionally…

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How To Proofread Like A Professional: 5 Tips

Kobo Writing Life

By Joan Selby

As a writer, proofreading your work is one of the most grueling tasks. Most writers (perhaps even the majority of writers) don’t like doing it. Even so, it is a vital part of the entire writing process because this helps you improve your work’s overall result. During this process, you start looking for any grammatical mistakes, spelling or punctuation mistakes. You make sure that you transmit your ideas logically and in a well-defined manner.

Due to recent advances in technology, writers are inclined to use the grammar-checking software. It can ease the entire process, that’s for sure, it can’t be compared to a human proofreader and editor. This kind of software should be used as a complement to the human proofreader, not a replacement.

If you want to skip the proofreading process, you can always hire a professional editor from various services such as BestEssays. This…

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How to do a developmental edit yourself

John Robin's Blog

Friday is here again, which means another blog post from me!

Today I’m following up on last week’s post on the importance of developmental editing, by popular request, with a how-to for writers who want to try and do it themselves. (If you missed last week’s post, read it here.)

Meanwhile, on our blog, I hope you enjoyed this week’s post from Byron Gillan, on magic and environment in fantasy (read it here) and Sean Gallagher’s great post on his own magic in the world of Mysts (read it here). Next month, we’ll be talking about what inspires us to write the fantasy stories we write, so stay tuned for that.

Before I dive into the how-to, I want to announce something exciting that I’m starting next Friday. World Builders 3.0!

For those who followed the World Builders series, this started with the original world builders (read…

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5 More Common Mistakes I See As An Editor