Tag Archives: civil rights

Remembering Maya Angelou & MLK

Black History: Special Delivery!!


Today we remember the incomparable Maya Angelou. She would have been 89 today (4/4/17). Many don’t know that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated on her 40th birthday birthday in 1968. After his assassination, she refused to celebrate her birthday. Instead she would send flowers to King’s widow, Coretta Scott King.

Ironically before Dr. King’s death, he had asked, Maya Angelou to travel with him and visit churches to raise money for his efforts to support the poor. Angelou agreed, but stated she could not begin until after her birthday. A promise she would never get the chance to fulfill. She was notified of his death while preparing for her birthday party.

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Walking With The Wind: A Memoir of the Movement by John Lewis– Book Review by Julie Ahn

Race, Class and Ethnicity in American History

For a boy who grew up in the cotton farms of Alabama, to now a sixth-term United States Congressman, John Lewis led an extraordinary life that helped changed American history. Growing up knowing he was different from his cotton farming family, John Lewis left his Alabama home and went to Nashville to study at a Baptist college, where his life and the civil rights movement became inexorably entwined. John Lewis embarked on this peaceful protest and strode into the forefront of the civil rights movement partaking in the lunch counter sit ins, Freedom Rides, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, Bloody Sunday in Selma, and the March to Montgomery. Through all the threats, beatings, taunts, arrests, and injustice, John Lewis describes in his memoir, Walking with the Wind, how he challenged a system that was injustice and helped people of race to achieve their full potential, becoming one…

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Encouraging Activism: A Conversation with Rodney L. Hurst Sr.

K E Garland

Rodney L. Hurst Sr. has worked as a civil right activist for sixty-one years. His initial involvement with NAACP’s youth council led him to organize sit-ins at several downtown Jacksonville, Florida lunch counters during the 60s and 70s. The fight for equality and the subsequent and infamous Ax Handle Saturday are detailed in his memoir, It Was Never about a Hot Dog and a Coke®!

On May 26th Mr. Hurst and I discussed civil rights and advocacy. Unfortunately, his words are still timely.

KG:     Your book describes racial oppression and police brutality from decades ago. Has anything changed?

RH:     No.

KG:     Nothing at all?

RH:     I mean based on what we’re seeing today, we had instances of police brutality years ago, back in the 50s and 60s. We did not have pictures and videos. So, it was your word against ours. And they were agents of…

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“Witness To Change” Memoir Recounts Civil Rights Struggles Of New Orleans

BCNN1 WP

Sybil Morial has written a memoir about growing up in segregated New Orleans. /Courtesy John F. Blair Sybil Morial has written a memoir about growing up in segregated New Orleans.
/Courtesy John F. Blair

If you’re from New Orleans, you’re probably familiar with the Morial family. Two of them have served as mayors of the city. But the story of Sybil Haydel Morial has not been fully told until now.

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Little Known Black History Fact: Albert Einstein And Civil Rights

Black America Web

When Albert Einstein announced his “Theory of Relativity” 100 years ago, it solidified the German-born scientist’s legend. But what some may not know is that Einstein was also a staunch supporter of civil rights causes and once called racism a “disease of white people” in a speech.

In 1946, Einstein was invited to Lincoln University to offer a commencement speech to its students and to also accept an honorary degree. The speech was a significant moment as Einstein, who was in poor health, famously refused speaking engagements and honorary degrees. Einstein used the platform of a predominantly Black college to speak to students about racism, something he faced as a Jew living in war-torn Germany.

Einstein arrived in the United States in 1933 and  began teaching at Princeton University, a position he held until his death 22 years later. Einstein fled Nazi Germany ahead of the genocide of what various…

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