Tag Archives: Civil Rights Movement

Walking With The Wind: A Memoir of the Movement by John Lewis– Book Review by Julie Ahn

Race, Class and Ethnicity in American History

For a boy who grew up in the cotton farms of Alabama, to now a sixth-term United States Congressman, John Lewis led an extraordinary life that helped changed American history. Growing up knowing he was different from his cotton farming family, John Lewis left his Alabama home and went to Nashville to study at a Baptist college, where his life and the civil rights movement became inexorably entwined. John Lewis embarked on this peaceful protest and strode into the forefront of the civil rights movement partaking in the lunch counter sit ins, Freedom Rides, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, Bloody Sunday in Selma, and the March to Montgomery. Through all the threats, beatings, taunts, arrests, and injustice, John Lewis describes in his memoir, Walking with the Wind, how he challenged a system that was injustice and helped people of race to achieve their full potential, becoming one…

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“March” by John Lewis

chronic bibliophilia

marchtrilogy960x510Alternating between Inauguration Day 2009 and the 1960s, John Lewis, along with co-author Andrew Aydin and Illustrator Nate Powell, tell the story of the civil rights movement through three powerful graphic novels. The trilogy – “March” – follows Lewis from his childhood growing up on a farm in Alabama through his increasing inspiration and involvement in the civil rights movement. Through the stories of protests, sit-ins, the Freedom Ride, the March on Washington, and the signing of the Voting Rights Act, Lewis makes this legendary struggle palpably real and persuasively relevant.

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The “March” trilogy is easily accessible and yet undoubtedly powerful. Its illustrations are stark and evocative; its words are sparse and moving. Each panel advances this gut-wrenching story in a way that makes it clear – this is not just a history lesson. It is a plea for remembrance and a call to action. Published between 2013 and 2016, these novels are timely…

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Ruby Bridges

Civil Rights Movement

U.S. Marshals escorting Ruby from school. U.S. Marshals escorting Ruby from school.


Ruby Bridges is most widely known to  the first African American to attend an all white  elementary school. She was ironically born on September 8, 1954 – the same year the Supreme Court’s decision Brown vs. Board of Education, desegregated schools. African American children were forced to take  an especially harder test in order to enter these white schools. In 1960, Ruby found out that she was one of the only six African American students to pass the test and able to attend the William Frantz School. Ruby’s presence caused many white parents to remove their children from school in disgust, and there were riots almost every day of Ruby’s attendance there.

Despite the blatant racism she faced each day, people commented that Ruby never cried or whimpered; Charles Burks, one of her escorts, said, “she just marched along like a little soldier”. Her…

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Freedom Riders: It wasn’t about race, it was about rights

The trailer is powerful!!! but not for the faint at heart.

A Melange of Musings

The 1961 Freedom Rides, organized by CORE, were modeled after the organization’s 1947 Journey of Reconciliation. During the 1947 action, African-American and white bus riders tested the 1946 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Morgan v. Virginia that segregated bus seating was unconstitutional. The 1961 Freedom Rides sought to test a 1960 decision by the Supreme Court in Boynton v. Virginia that segregation of interstate transportation facilities, including bus terminals, was unconstitutional as well. A big difference between the 1947 Journey of Reconciliation and the 1961 Freedom Rides was the inclusion of women in the later initiative. In both actions, black riders traveled to the American South–where segregation continued to occur–and attempted to use whites-only restrooms, lunch counters and waiting rooms.

http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/freedom-rides

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Before we go any further I want y’all to think about that. Black and White, men and women, got on a bus to drive deep into the South…

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‘My Time with the Kings’: New Memoir by AP Reporter Recalls Covering MLK and his Family

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ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JAN. 17, 2015 AND THEREAFTER - In this 1968 photo, Coretta Scott King and AP reporter Kathryn Johnson, left, review plans for The King Center during a meeting on the campus of Atlanta University in Atlanta. In a new memoir, "My Life with the Kings: A Reporter's Recollections of Martin, Coretta and the Civil Rights Movement," retired Associated Press reporter Kathryn Johnson describes many civil rights flashpoints that she covered in the 1960s, and details her close relationship with the movement’s leader, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and his family. (AP Photo) ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, JAN. 17, 2015 AND THEREAFTER – In this 1968 photo, Coretta Scott King and AP reporter Kathryn Johnson, left, review plans for The King Center during a meeting on the campus of Atlanta University in Atlanta. In a new memoir, “My Life with the Kings: A Reporter’s Recollections of Martin, Coretta and the Civil Rights Movement,” retired Associated Press reporter Kathryn Johnson describes many civil rights flashpoints that she covered in the 1960s, and details her close relationship with the movement’s leader, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and his family. (AP Photo)

In a new memoir, “My Time with the Kings: A Reporter’s Recollections of Martin, Coretta and the Civil Rights Movement,” retired Associated Press reporter Kathryn Johnson describes civil rights flashpoints she covered in the 1960s and details her close relationship with the movement’s leader, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and his family.

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Roger Ebert’s Widow Chaz To Direct Emmett Till Biopic

Black America Web

Chaz Ebert Source: Timothy Hiatt / Stringer / Getty
Roger Ebert?s widow Chaz Ebert will bring Emmett Till?s story to the big screen in the film-adaptation of Death of Innocence: The Story of the Hate Crime That Changed America, a book penned by his mother Mamie Till-Mobley and journalist Christopher Benson.

Till was lynched in 1955 after allegedly whistling at a White woman. His death galvanized the Civil Rights movement.

“The full Emmett Till story needs to be told now and told well as a narrative for our times, given all that is happening on American streets today and Shatterglass Films are the people to tell it,” Ebert said.

Filming is slated to begin next year in Illinois and Mississippi.

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Little Known Black History Fact: Civil Rights Act of 1964

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The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson on this day, the first in a trio of laws that passed which ushered in a new wave of racial equality. Despite the tragic circumstances leading up to the passing of the bill, the moment was instrumental in changing the future of Black America.

On June 11, 1963, President John F. Kennedy made an appeal in a televised civil rights-themed speech that called for legislation that would give equal rights for anyone to enter public establishments. The speech came after Birmingham Campaign in 1963, which ended violently for peaceful civil rights activists, students and children in Alabama.

Kennedy and the impending bill were met with resistance, this after New York congressman Emmanuel Celler and the House Judiciary Committee made tweaks to the law to include a ban on racial discrimination for employment, eliminating segregation in all public…

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Little Known Black History Fact: Birmingham Children’s Crusade

This post highlights an interesting fact that most people may not be aware of–that many elementary-aged children participated in The Civil Rights Movement.

Black America Web

The Children’s Crusade march in Birmingham, Ala. offered the world a firsthand look at the extreme bigotry and violent resistance the Civil Rights Movement faced. On May 2, 1963 a peaceful protest escalated into a brutal show of force from racists determined to snatch equal rights from the hands of young Black people.

In 1963, Rev. James Bevel crafted the idea of a citywide protest led by Birmingham school students against segregated classrooms. Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., disagreed at first. He thought using minors put them in too much danger.

But Bevel was able to get the idea off the ground. The march began with thousands of students walking out of class and organizing in groups at the Sixth Street Baptist Church in downtown Birmingham. Birmingham police headed the group off and began arresting students, despite their lack of aggression.

The next day, more students gathered, which prompted…

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