Tag Archives: civil rights activists

Walking With The Wind: A Memoir of the Movement by John Lewis– Book Review by Julie Ahn

Race, Class and Ethnicity in American History

For a boy who grew up in the cotton farms of Alabama, to now a sixth-term United States Congressman, John Lewis led an extraordinary life that helped changed American history. Growing up knowing he was different from his cotton farming family, John Lewis left his Alabama home and went to Nashville to study at a Baptist college, where his life and the civil rights movement became inexorably entwined. John Lewis embarked on this peaceful protest and strode into the forefront of the civil rights movement partaking in the lunch counter sit ins, Freedom Rides, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, Bloody Sunday in Selma, and the March to Montgomery. Through all the threats, beatings, taunts, arrests, and injustice, John Lewis describes in his memoir, Walking with the Wind, how he challenged a system that was injustice and helped people of race to achieve their full potential, becoming one…

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Little Known Black History Fact: Dr. Maya Angelou

Black America Web

Author, poet and civil rights activist Dr. Maya Angelou died Wednesday at the age of 86. As one of the literary world’s most influential figures, Angelou’s legacy has been enriched by a life replete with terrible struggles overcome by amazing triumphs.

Angelou was born Marguerite Ann Johnson on April 4, 1928 in St. Louis, Mo. Her older brother gave her the nickname Maya, which stuck with her throughout her life. When her parents split up, Maya and her brother were sent to live in Arkansas with a grandparent.

When reunited in St. Loius with their mother, Angelou was assaulted by her mother’s boyfriend when she was just eight years old. The man was charged but only jailed for a day, and was later found dead. This series of events traumatized Angelou but also led to her creative awakening.

The siblings were sent back to Arkansas, which like much of the…

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President Obama Mourns Death Of Poet, Author Maya Angelou

Black America Web

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama said Wednesday that the death of poet and author Maya Angelou has dimmed “one of the brightest lights of our time.”

Obama said in a statement that he and first lady Michelle Obama will cherish the time they spent with Angelou.

He said Angelou had the ability to remind us that we are all God’s children and that we all have something to offer.

“Michelle and I join millions around the world in remembering one of the brightest lights of our time: a brilliant writer, a fierce friend and a truly phenomenal woman,” Obama said.

“Over the course of her remarkable life, Maya was many things: an author, poet, civil rights activist, playwright, actress, director, composer, singer and dancer. But above all, she was a storyteller, and her greatest stories were true.

Obama said “a childhood of suffering and abuse actually drove her to…

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