Tag Archives: book sales

7 Ways to Boost Your Book Sales

A Writer's Path

by Annmarie McQueen

In my last post, I looked at how to prepare yourself for self-publishing. This time I’ll be focusing on what to do once your book is already out there, and how to increase your sales revenue. Here are my top tips for marketing your novel on Amazon:

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The Value of Consistent Book Marketing

How To Ebook

From my years in publishing, I find many writers expect to have instant success.|

While they may not say it verbally, they show this expectation in other ways. It makes sense since we live in a fast-moving, instant message world. One of the ways I see this expectation is in contract negotiations with new authors. In the details of the contract sometimes writers try and narrow the length of the contract to two or three years. I understand their desire but I often end up explaining that books sometimes take several years to take off and reach the public. At Morgan James Publishing, we’ve had a number of books with modest sales in the beginning, but the author consistently works at marketing and spreading the word about their book. These authors try multiple approaches to reach their audience. Then almost without explanation, their book begins to consistently sell…

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The Importance of the Book Pre-Order to Authors

A Writer's Path

by John Briggs

Does it really matter if you order a book online before its official release date? Before its “book birthday” as they say in publishing? Well, maybe not to the reader, who’s happy to get the book they want to read when they want to read it, but pre-orders can make a huge difference to a book’s success.

How does a pre-order change the odds compared to a regular order?

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Why Authors Need to Be as Accessible as Possible

A Writer's Path

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by Katie McCoach

As an author today, you know that every reader is valuable. You love your readers; you want to keep the ones who are loyal and reach new ones. That’s what promotion and growing a business is all about – reaching new consumers.

That’s why it’s so important for authors to be as accessible to readers as possible.The easier a reader can find you and buy your books, the easier it will be to reach wider audiences.

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5 self-publishing truths few authors talk about

This reblog is certainly not the most encouraging piece I’ve read on writing and publishing. Ultimately, I think it depends on how you look at your writing career, whether you see the glass as half full or half empty. There is definitely a place for realistic expectations. Even though my memoir is not scheduled to be published until spring 2016, I’m glad that Dylan shared this dose of reality before I stepped off the curb. What do you think?

Suffolk Scribblings

writing-is-hard

One of the hardest thing to watch on social media is an author, usually a debut author, getting excited about their upcoming book launch and knowing they are about to get hit around the head with a hard dose of reality.

They’ve done the right things, built up a twitter or Facebook following, blogged about the book, sent copies out for review, told all their friends about the upcoming launch, pulled together a promo video and graphic, maybe taken out some adverts. The first few days after launch are filled with excited tweets, mentions of early positive reviews and chart rankings. Then, after a few days, maybe a few weeks, the positive tweets stop and an air of desperation sets in as the reality of life as an indie author hits home.

Part of the problem is that the authors most vocal on social media are those that have already seen self-publishing…

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When nobody reads your writing

I am reblogging this post mainly for the link to the article “Amazon Offers All-You-Can-Eat Books. Authors Turn Up Their Noses,” reported in The New York Times by David Streitfeld on December 27, 2014. (To read it, click on the link.)This article interests me, and may interest you as well, because when Amazon rolled out the Kindle Unlimited sales strategy, I was skeptical, even though my book hasn’t been published yet. From reading the article, It appears I do have reason to be concerned, even though I am not clear how Kindle Unlimited has affected all authors. If anyone has a book on Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited, I would love to hear your thoughts.

Jamie Fessenden's Blog

386200_2673280425520_1061443511_32785704_1832786642_n.jpgWhenever an article or blog comes out in which an author grumbles about lack of sales, as author Michael Henderson did in this recent article about Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited program, it’s common for people to slam them as whiners who don’t respect reader’s choices to buy other authors’ works, or worse, to claim it’s because their work is obviously inferior.

I don’t like this.

Michael Henderson will probably do just fine thanks to the boost his sales are likely to get from the article—he’s at least picked up one good review from it—but I’d like to address a few points:

  1. Amazon has over 3 million eBooks available.  It’s illogical to assume that any reader is able to go through that morass of brilliant and god-awful novels and decide which are good and which are not, in his or her opinion.  Readers — and that includes every author I’ve ever known…

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