Tag Archives: book review

A long way home by Saroo Brierley

rrlreads

Amy A Long Way HomeNot the most beautifully written, A Long Way Home is an extraordinary story of a very small, lost, boy holding tight to his memories, being supported by his adoptive parents and using technology methodically and painstakingly to find his family. It is uplifting and hopeful, if not very revealing of personality.

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Yecheilyah’s Book Reviews – Even Rain is Just Water: A Memoir of Rejection, Revelation & Redemption by Lynette Davis

Pearls Before Swine

Title: Even Rain is Just Water: A Memoir of Rejection, Revelation & Redemption

Author: Lynette Davis

Print Length: 296 pages

Publisher: Reflections Books; 1 edition (May 30, 2017)

Publication Date: May 30, 2017

Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC

Language: English

ASIN: B071DC83TN

*I received this book as a gift from the author*

When I first read the title of this book, I knew that I would read it. With a powerful statement, as Even Rain is Just Water it had to be good. I was not disappointed. Lynette Davis gives us a riveting account of her life as the victim of emotional abuse at the hands of someone who is to be a girl’s first teacher, supporter, and motivator. Her mother.

The testimony switches back and forth between Lyn’s experiences as a child and as an adult, both of which include some form of emotional abuse and neglect. Lyn’s…

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A Call for Reviewers (of Memoir)

Book Review picture

My memoir Even Rain Is Just Water is now available for review. And I’m offering a digital copy (epub or mobi) of the ARC (advanced review copy) via Netgalley to followers of my blog, ahead of the June 30th paperback release. I know some of you love to read memoirs as much as I do!

Here is what a few readers have said:

“Even Rain Is Just Water is a thought-provoking, tear-jerking and heart-wrenching memoir depicting the journey of a child as she endures developing tools to escape a stifling home environment. You’ll cheer her on as she approaches each heartache with strength and determination.”

BETTY TUCKER, author of Don’t Worry If the Mule Goes Blind

“WOW! Lynette’s account of rejection, revelation and redemption will evoke a myriad of emotions. Her story will offer hope to many. It’s proof that with faith, strength, courage, and determination you can move forward, no matter what obstacles you may face along the way.”

DONA M. DEANE, author of It’s All Up to You: Strive to Feel Better, Do Better and Live Better

“All through her childhood, Lyn knows that her mothers feels differently about her than she does about Lyn’s sister Ne-Ne. To escape what she does not understand, she embarks on a painful life filled with homelessness and trauma. Redemption will come at a price she cannot imagine. Thoughtfully and sensitively presented.

POLLY KRIZE, Netgalley Reviewer

“Like the flower coming up through the sidewalk, Lyn triumphs again and again.”

CHERILYN CHRISTEN CLOUGH  littleredsurvivor.com

“A remarkable and heart-wrenching accounting of Davis’ … undeniable courage and tolerance for suffering a lifetime of conflict, adversity and emotional abuse…”

D.G. KAYE, author of P.S. I Forgive You: A Broken Legacy and Conflicted Heart 

“A courageous voyage of one daughter’s remarkable journey in finding love, security and a place to call home against the demons of her past.”

MARY A PEREZ, author of Running in Hells: A Memoir of Grit and Grace

“This book tells the author’s incredible life story. The author has survived so much abuse, yet still has a strong faith in God. She is inspiring!”

CYNTHIA BAILEY-RUG Cynthiabaileyrug.wordpress.com

“Firstly, I love the title… This is a tale of God, belief and is beautifully told. I would recommend as a book club read as it asks as many questions as it answers.”

TRACY SHEPHARD, Netgalley Reviewer

“Great memoir! And I would highly recommend this book.

LISA CLARK, Netgally Reviewer

 

Read the first few chapters on Amazon’s Look Inside. If you would like to review Even Rain Is Just Water, contact me at lynettedavisauthor (at) gmail (dot) com before June 30th.

Thank you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walking With The Wind: A Memoir of the Movement by John Lewis– Book Review by Julie Ahn

Race, Class and Ethnicity in American History

For a boy who grew up in the cotton farms of Alabama, to now a sixth-term United States Congressman, John Lewis led an extraordinary life that helped changed American history. Growing up knowing he was different from his cotton farming family, John Lewis left his Alabama home and went to Nashville to study at a Baptist college, where his life and the civil rights movement became inexorably entwined. John Lewis embarked on this peaceful protest and strode into the forefront of the civil rights movement partaking in the lunch counter sit ins, Freedom Rides, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, Bloody Sunday in Selma, and the March to Montgomery. Through all the threats, beatings, taunts, arrests, and injustice, John Lewis describes in his memoir, Walking with the Wind, how he challenged a system that was injustice and helped people of race to achieve their full potential, becoming one…

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My Review of P.S. I Forgive You: A Broken Legacy by D.G. Kaye

Judith Barrow

P.S. I Forgive You: A Broken Legacy by [Kaye,D.G.]Book Description

Confronted with resurfacing feelings of guilt, D.G. Kaye is tormented by her decision to remain estranged from her dying emotionally abusive mother after resolving to banish her years ago, an event she has shared in her book Conflicted Hearts. In P.S. I Forgive You, Kaye takes us on a compelling heartfelt journey as she seeks to understand the roots of her mother’s narcissism, let go of past hurts, and find forgiveness for both her mother and herself.

After struggling for decades to break free, Kaye has severed the unhealthy ties that bound her to her dominating mother—but now Kaye battles new conflictions, as the guilt she harbours over her decision only increases as the end of her mother’s life draws near. Kaye once again struggles with her conscience and her feelings of being obligated to return to a painful past she thought she left behind.

My Review:

When…

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It’s not the load that breaks us down–heaven knows if we could see it all at once we might just shift our hips and find a better way to carry it–no, it’s the shrapnel of lif…

Source: Healing from Hidden Abuse Book Review

A Haven for Book Lovers

ArtImage-Large-PhenomenalWoman_c062b178-bcd5-45d3-baf6-9e1b7074cf53_grandePhenomenal Woman has always been one of my favorite poems by Maya Angelou. I first heard the poem when it was recited by Janet Jackson in a 90s movie also featuring, Tupac; Poetic Justice. I fell in love with the words. However, I only got to read my first book by Maya after her death.

I know why the Caged Bird Sings is one of the books in Maya Angelou’s autobiography series. The autobiography tells of a heartbreaking story of Maya and her brother, Bailey who were sent away from home by their parents at an early age. The children traveled alone with tags tied to their wrists written ‘To whom it may concern’. They moved in with their grandma at Swamps in Arkansas. Life in Arkansas was full of ups and downs. There was a lot of tension from the racism engulfing the town at the…

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TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD BY HARPER LEE

The Bookynista

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To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Hachette Book Group Grand Central Edition

My Ratings: 5/5

Goodreads Synopsis: The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic.

Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior – to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. Now with over 18 million copies in print and translated into ten languages, this regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded…

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Everything I Never Told You / Celeste Ng

Robert Up At Dawn

Lydia Lee, a teenager, has died by drowning. Was it it accidental, a suicide, or could it be murder? In this debut novel by Celeste Ng, focusing on the remaining family members, she unravels, layer by layer, the onion skin of conflicting opinions to get to the truth.

The Lee family, a Chinese-American mixed race family, are living the typical middle class existence in a small Ohio town in the 1970s. James, the father, is a professor at a small college. Marilyn, the mother, once dreamed of becoming a doctor. Her dream was derailed when she married James (against her mother’s wishes) and soon found herself pregnant. Over the years, the couple has had three children . From the outside looking in, it appears to be a stable, happy family.

But Marilyn has obsessively transferred onto Lydia her dream of becoming a physician. James, with Chinese parents, despite his successes…

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The Turner House & The Twelve Tribes of Hattie

booksploitation

I’m not sure what took me so long to read both The Turner House and The Twelve Tribes of Hattie but it made sense to read them together as companion pieces. Both of these books are so amazing that I don’t want it to seem as if they are interchangeable. While both examine African American life and feature large families living out The Great Migration, the writing in each is distinct. I could write so much about these books so examining both at once does not mean each is not each worthy of an individual post. And I don’t often say this, but both of these books would make great movies.

When I was young, my mother, who had a parent and grandparents who were part of The Great Migration, hung a museum poster of a picture from this time period in our living room. At the time I…

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