Tag Archives: Black literature

#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge 2018

It’s February and that means Black History Month in the United States, which also means #ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge 2018 is underway! #ReadSoulLit is the brainchild of Didi Borie, who shares her impressions of the books she reads on her blog and book tube channel, both aptly named Brown Girl Reading. Didi and I first got […]

via Are You Apprehensive About Reading Books by Black Authors? A Chat with #ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Creator, Didi Borie — Folklore & Literacy

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On a voyage of self-discovery: James Baldwin. Photograph: Ralph Gatti/AFP/Getty Images On a voyage of self-discovery: James Baldwin. Photograph: Ralph Gatti/AFP/Getty Images

Baldwin’s landmark collection of essays explores, in telling language, what it means to be a black man in modern America

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The Autobiography of my Mother: A Review

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the autobiography of my mother

When Meursault learns of his mother’s death in Albert Camus’ The Stranger, he is apathetic to say the least. It is this strange detachment from emotion Camus explores in his existential search of meaning and existence. Fifty-four years later Jamaica Kincaid’s Xuela is also confronted with the loss of her mother and regards it with Mersault’s similar apathetic detachment as she states:

“My mother died at the moment I was born, and so for my whole life there was nothing standing between myself and eternity; at my back was always a bleak, black wind”

but unlike Meursault, Xuela does not get to attend her mother’s funeral as she is but a newborn when her mother dies. Much like Camus’ interrogation of the existential question of existence, Kincaid explores the affects of a severed bond between mother and child in a theme that stretches far beyond Xuela’s personal story. 

Mother’s are…

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