Tag Archives: abuse

3 Reasons To Support My #InvisibleScars Emotional Abuse Awareness Campaign

Allow me to introduce myself to some and re-introduce myself to others. My name is Lynette Davis and I’m the author of Even Rain Is Just Water, A Memoir of Rejection, Revelation & Redemption. My memoir is about a lonely little girl looking for love and acceptance that shows how childhood trauma transcends into adulthood and continues to affect survivors.

We’re ten days into a 30-day social campaign called #InvisibleScars, which is approximately one-third of the way.  It’s a campaign to raise awareness about emotional abuse. It began on September 7th and ends on October 7th. This is a matter that is close to me because in my subtitle, the word rejection is i.e. for emotional abuse. One of my commitments upon publishing my story is to help bring more awareness to this insidious type of abuse.

Three reasons to support this campaign:

Emotional Abuse_10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First, it’s for a very good cause. By supporting this campaign, you will be helping to raise awareness so that more people can be helped. This type of abuse also produces trauma. Emotional abuse is insidious, that is, it’s gradual and done over and over, over a period of time, and therefore is not easily noticed. It’s so insidious that most people who experience emotional abuse don’t even know they are being emotionally abused. That certainly was true, in my case as well. I did not realize it was abuse until one of my beta readers, upon reading my first draft, responded about the “abuse” I had experienced. “Abuse? What abuse?”

emotional abuse_2_images

Secondly, Simply by supporting the #InvisibleScars campaign, you can be the voice on October 7th for countless voiceless victims who have been silenced and feel powerless and defeated due to their chronic or long-term exposure to emotional abuse, for which they have no escape. (On October 7th, we’re going to make one loud thunderous clap so their voices, along with ours, can be heard.) And

 

emotional abuse_3_images

 

Thirdly, It won’t cost you one red cent. That’s right. It doesn’t cost you anything to support this campaign, other than five seconds of your time. And, it’s safe and secure. You’re only giving Thunderclap permission to tweet (Twitter) or post (Facebook or Tumbler) one time, at a designated time. That is all.

Please support this campaign by clicking on:

  • this link:  #InvisibleScars
  • one of the red bars labeled “Twitter,” “Facebook,” or “Tumbler”  

That’s it. You don’t have to do anything else. And on October 7th, we’ll “put emotional abuse on blast!”

Much gratitude to the individuals who have already supported this campaign.

Lynette

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

#BookReview – P.S. I Forgive You – A Broken Legacy by D.G. Kaye #Memoir #Narcissism

deborahjay

On the eve of my father’s funeral, I find myself writing my review of this memoir with a real sense of gratitude that I was lucky enough to have loving parents, and little dysfunctionality in my family. My father was raised in a rather Victorian household, (he was born in 1915), where children were seen but not heard, which made him always a quiet man, but no less loving for it, though he rarely expressed emotion.

Tomorrow I shall say goodbye to him in the knowledge that he lived a long and satisfied life, leaving no regrets at the end on any of our parts, unlike my poor friend Debby Gies (author D.G. Kaye), who suffered a traumatic childhood.

Thanks, Debby. Whilst I sorrow for your travails, you’ve gifted me with a great contrast to recognise at this sad time how fortunate I have been.

P.S. I Forgive You: A Broken LegacyP.S. I Forgive You: A Broken Legacy by D.G…

View original post 219 more words

Whatever is in your heart, becomes your words…

paulaharmondownes

How does the saying ‘sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me’ make you feel?

I was about five, reporting being bullied, when I first heard it.

Two adults who should have known better were the ones who said them.

One was a teacher, the first in a long line who went on to say ‘just keep away from the bullies and they’ll keep away from you’ and went off to have tea in the staff-room. Obviously, that’s exactly what bullies do, isn’t it? They would never think of pursuing you. Of course not. What she meant (I hope) was ‘don’t show them that they are getting to you.’ What I heard was ‘don’t bother me with your problems. I don’t care about you.’

The other was an adult family member, who followed it up with ‘you just have to put up with it, it…

View original post 912 more words

Your Narcissistic Mother has been Elected President

It’s as if your narcissistic mother has been elected president. Your version of reality is wrong. History’s version of reality is wrong. Science’s version of reality is wrong. Facts are infuriating…

Source: Your Narcissistic Mother has been Elected President: Resist with Joy

PTSD Survivors: Why is validation so important for healing?

living in stigma

dissociation 3

Throughout my years in therapy, validation was comparable to receiving a gift, at times triggering tears of sadness, yet happiness and contentment at the same time.   Finally, someone was not ignoring me, was respecting my feelings and best of all, no interruptions with cruel words.  As a daughter of a narcissistic mother, very rarely showing any validation, empathy and usually telling me “you’re making things up again.”, this was all new to me.

Validation means to express understanding and acceptance of another person’s internal experience, whatever that might be. Validation does not mean you agree or approve. Validation builds relationships and helps ease upset feelings. Knowing that you are understood and that your emotions and thoughts are accepted by others is powerful. Validation is like relationship glue. – psychologytoday.com

This article from PsychCentral.com explains ‘Validation’.

Have you ever wished you could take back an email that you sent when you were…

View original post 679 more words

Understanding and Healing the Scapegoat Within

Emerging From The Dark Night

offended

The family scapegoat receives the shadow projections of the family. They are the one that carries and tries to express qualities, needs, reactions and expressions which may not have had a chance or live in the family.  Often if we review the family history we will be able to see a pattern or something the scapegoat is trying to live for the family that could not be expressed, or struggled to be expressed over generations.

There is also collective element to the scapegoat which means certain qualities in any particular culture are accepted and are seen as valuable to express where as others may be demonised. Religious beliefs create the scapegoat by dictating what is “holy” and what is “demonic” and so create splits. The pervasive spread of the Catholic zeitgeist, for example, reveres qualities of self sacrifice, meekness, chastity and in many ways a repression of essential elements of…

View original post 1,480 more words

How to be your own parent

how to have a breakdown

If healing were a linear narrative (which it most certainly isn’t), my most recent realizations would be significant enough to indicate a new milestone.

What I mean, is that my curiosity about why I am the way I am as an adult has led me to the concept of emotional neglect. If you want to familiarize yourself with this concept, I would recommend checking out the work of psychologist Dr Jonice Webb. I found her through a great episode of the podcast “Mental Illness Happy Hour” which can be found here.

Essentially though, the idea is that sometimes the most harm comes not from abuse that is inflicted upon an individual, but instead what is withheld from them. It’s often really hard to recognize after the fact because there isn’t a specific incident or experience to remember, instead it’s the absence of an experience that becomes harmful.

As Dr. Jonice…

View original post 321 more words

Emotional abuse

up-an-atom

Emotional abuse is very difficult to identify and even more difficult to prove. It’s sly, underhanded, artful and calculated. It’s important to know it is happening to you and it is important to notice it might be happening to someone else. Emotional abusers often have their reasons. It that awful cycle of abuse where you have been abused and you become the abuser. Emotional abuse can occur in the home , at work, from society at large …people. Unless we are clear about what it is and how to manage it then victims will continue to suffer. It can have dire consequences. A person can be so robbed of themselves, their hopes and dreams until they are in despair and dysfunctional. The worst thing is they have nothing to show anyone. Just what they think and how they feel. It has to be stopped like any other form of abuse…

View original post 73 more words