Tag Archives: 1970s

Not Exactly Love: A Memoir by Betty Hafner

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Alt=Not Exactly Love: A Memoir by Betty Hafner

It was 1969, and all the rules were changing, when Betty, a woefully single French teacher on Long Island, met the handsome but edgy new teacher at her school, a hippie just back from Woodstock. His vitality opened up a new world to her—but when they married, his rages turned against her, and often ended with physical violence. Like millions of women who discover they’ve married an abusive man, Betty was forced to make daily decisions—to suppress her feelings or risk confrontation, to keep it secret or report, and ultimately, to live with it or leave.

Part memoir, part warm-hearted look at the ’70s, and part therapeutic journey, Not Exactly Love: A Memoir is an intense and inspirational story of a woman who grew from her experience

Review:

It’s 1969, on Long Island, NY, unmarried and single French teacher, Betty, meets a…

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“SOUL TRAIN Theme Song – By the Sound Of Philadelphia and the Three Degree Vocals”

AMERICA ON COFFEE

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“TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia)” is a 1973 hit recording by MFSB (Mother, Father, Sister, Brother) featuring vocals by

The Three Degrees

. A classic example of the Philadelphia soul genre, it was written by Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff as the theme for the American musical television program

Soul Train,

which specialized in African American musical performers. The single was released on the Philadelphia International label. It was the first television theme song to reach number one on the Billboard Hot 100,[1] and it is arguably the first disco song to reach that position.

The song is essentially an instrumental piece, featuring a lush blend of strings and horns in the Philadelphia soul style.

There are only two vocal parts to the song: a passage close to the beginning during which The Three Degrees sing “People all over the world!”; and the chorus over the fadeout, “Let’s…

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“Wake Up Everybody – Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes (A Kevin Caruso Video)” on YouTube

Who else, besides me, loved Harold Melvin’s song “I Miss You” from back in the day?

AMERICA ON COFFEE

Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes

were an American singing group, one of the most popular Philadelphia soul groups of the 1970s. The group’s repertoire included soul, R&B, doo-wop, and disco.

Founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the early 1950s as The Charlemagnes, the group is most noted for several hits on Gamble and Huff’s Philadelphia International label between 1972 and 1976, although they performed and recorded until Melvin’s death in 1997. However, the remaining members, the Blue Notes, were reunited in 2013 for the Soul Train Cruise, and will reunite again in 2015, during the fourth sailing.

Despite group founder and original lead singer Harold Melvin’s top billing, the Blue Notes’ most famous member was Teddy Pendergrass, their lead singer during the successful years at Philadelphia International.

History

The group formerly known as The Charlemagnes took on the name “The Blue Notes” in 1954, with a lineup consisting of lead…

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Protests, Unrest & Flares: An Analysis of ’70s Fashion Then and Now

Something a little different. Happy Friday!

georgiabey

70s trend - GivenchyGivenchy 1973

It’s safe to say that the 70s are having a moment. You can barely turn your head without catching sight of wide legged trousers, metallic, jumpsuits or platform shoes – and any Pinterest fiend will be able to tell you that even in the world of interior trends, old-school crafts like macramé and crochet are having a revival too.

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The First Time I Almost Died: An Excerpt From the Memoir – The Making of a Miscreant

Life in HD

Searbury Rd in Cherry Hill, Baltimore, MD Seabury Rd in Cherry Hill, Baltimore, MD

I don’t know if I woke up that morning with a plan or, like many boys, decided to turn found junk into opportunity.  Or perhaps it was another kid’s idea.  But the plan on a hot, sunny, summer’s day in the early 1970’s was to catch some frogs.  Nothing at all unique about this endeavor for rural pre-teen boys, but for urban youth, it required a measure of planning and adventure.

2438 Seabury Rd in the Cherry Hill section of Baltimore, MD was home.  It was my home.  I lived in Section 8 housing but I didn’t know it at the time.  A single mom and two boys living in an apartment on the right-hand side of the court, eventually moved to a townhouse over on the left.  That court was our world and we did not often venture far beyond its borders…

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