Literary Devices: How To Master Prologue

Writer's Blog

Prologue

This week Writer’s Blog will be exploring literary devices to help you along with your writing. Literary devices are techniques and structures writers employ to convey their message and story. When done well, the use of literary devices can alter, manipulate and challenge the way a reader perceives any work. Used masterfully, literary devices influence how a story or essay can be interpreted and analysed, as well as how much the reader enjoys the work. Today’s device is Prologue:

How To Master Prologue

What’s past is prologue” – William Shakespeare

This comes from Shakespeare’s play, The Tempest, spoken by the character Antonio who suggests that the events of the past set the stage for the present. The quote is engraved on the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, which houses the most important of the United States’ historical documents. But in a literary work, while the prologue…

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Born A Crime – Trevor Noah

Vivian Copeland's Best Books Of All Time

Comedy Central Daily Show Host, Trevor Noah, 33, details his childhood in South Africa, first under the despotism of apartheid and then after. The son of a white father and a black mother, Noah was born a crime since race mixing was, at the time, illegal. Light-skinned, he never fit comfortably into any racial mold. This book is more a paean to his mother than anything else. Fiercely religious and a strict disciplinarian, she refused to accept the status quo and made sure he had books and an education. Though admirable, his mother had problems which culminated in her being shot by an angry ex-husband. She survived, but the ex-husband walked with three years probation since police in South Africa routinely make light of domestic abuse. Equally chilling are the racial incidents Noah describes like being stopped by cops who took him and his friends to jail for no reason…

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How to Sell 1000 Copies of Your Self-Published Book on Day One: Interview with Paul Sohn 

How To Ebook

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/20 hours ago

The average self-published book sells 250 copies in its first year and maybe 1,000 copies in its lifetime. Most authors are ecstatic if they hit 1,000 copies in the first three months. But what if you sold 1,000 copies of your book on the first day it released?

Now, there is no such thing as an overnight success. Work that lasts and resonates with your audience requires consistent effort over an extended period of time.

Without a platform, without an email list, and without a community, you could not self-publish a book tomorrow and reasonably expect anything but dead air in response.

However, if you put in the effort, do your research, and engage with influencers and your target audience to build a loyal tribe, the sky really is the limit.

This week’s guest onThe Portfolio Life, successfully…

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The Unwritten Rules of Blogging

Novelty Revisions

New bloggers and seasoned bloggers alike have similar questions when it comes to doing their best work on their websites. What’s the right way to do this? How do I grow my audience? How do I increase engagement? How do I know I’m not somehow messing all this up?

There are the typical blogging rules all bloggers know to follow: write well, insert as much media as possible, use keywords, etc., etc.

But what about the rules not everyone talks about — the “unwritten rules”?

So I’m going to write down these unwritten rules for you, because I’m a writer and that’s what I do. My approach to blogging comes from over 8 years of typing words and hitting publish and still not always knowing exactly what people want from me — but I love every minute of it, and any wisdom I do have from all my years of…

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The Gift of Writing a Memoir

HarsH ReaLiTy

As I collaborate on another book to be released this summer, I reflect on anxiously waiting for my memoir, Untangled, A Story of Resilience, Courage, and Triumph to go live on Amazon, just 19 months ago. What a wonderful, unexpected and humbling time it has been.

I took a huge risk by writing and publishing my memoir. My entire life was focused on keeping quiet, not telling, protecting those I loved, or who loved me. It took me a long time to understand that by keeping quiet, I was actually protecting the people who hurt me in my life. Writing Untangled was a way to announce in a really big way, that I will not keep quiet any longer.

I literally went from telling no one but my therapist about my past to throwing my arms up, and saying, okay….what the f**k, let’s go for it, and tell everyone at once…

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How to do a developmental edit yourself

John Robin's Blog

Friday is here again, which means another blog post from me!

Today I’m following up on last week’s post on the importance of developmental editing, by popular request, with a how-to for writers who want to try and do it themselves. (If you missed last week’s post, read it here.)

Meanwhile, on our blog, I hope you enjoyed this week’s post from Byron Gillan, on magic and environment in fantasy (read it here) and Sean Gallagher’s great post on his own magic in the world of Mysts (read it here). Next month, we’ll be talking about what inspires us to write the fantasy stories we write, so stay tuned for that.

Before I dive into the how-to, I want to announce something exciting that I’m starting next Friday. World Builders 3.0!

For those who followed the World Builders series, this started with the original world builders (read…

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