Category Archives: Writing

How Working with a Critique Group Can Improve Your Manuscript

I wrote my first four novels without any outside input up to the point when I sent the second draft to a small group of pre-readers, made more changes and then on to my editor. Then I moved home from London to the English south coast and started work on novel number five, which became…

via How Working with a Critique Group can Improve your Manuscripts — Women Writers, Women’s Books

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Using Triggers to Poke at a Character’s Emotional Wound

Kobo Writing Life

By Angela Ackerman

When it comes to acknowledging what hurts us, the old saying, Deny, deny, deny! comes to mind. Why? Because in real life we don’t want to appear weak, so when we suffer emotional pain, we often stuff it down deep and paste on a smile as if nothing is wrong. It’s no different with our characters, and in both cases, refusing to deal with wounding events carries a steep price.

Unresolved psychological pain doesn’t go away and hiding it only leads to dysfunction and unhappiness.

Emotional trauma is, by nature, painful. When it happens, our feelings are laid bare. So it’s no wonder that last thing anyone wants to do is unpack that vulnerability again to work through it. Avoidance seems better, but it leads to dysfunctional coping methods like bad habits, flaws, biases, and emotional reactiveness.

This type of emotional shielding keeps people and further possible…

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Writing Reviews

T. R. Robinson Publications

adult-2242164_1280Though this discussion will concentrate upon the writing of book reviews, many of the principles will apply equally to the writing of reviews for other products.

Who reviews are for and what readers would like to gain from them has been previously discussed in Reviews – What Wanted? This discussion is intended to enlarge upon the theme, especially with regard to the elements of a review.

It must be acknowledged, for many, particularly those not accustomed to writing, preparing a review may prove a daunting prospect. Some may also find the degree of responsibility that comes with writing a review (to get the facts right and to represent the work fairly) uncomfortable.

There are three parts to this discussion: Why some readers do not write reviews; What a review should include; The presentation of a review.

Why do readers NOT write a review?

Prior to considering the possible…

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The Five Stages Of Revising Your Novel

Kobo Writing Life

By Lisa M. Lilly

You’ve finished a first draft of your novel. Now what?

If you’re like most writers (including me), your draft includes points that require more research, scenes that trail off, plot holes, or all of the above.

Addressing every issue at once is overwhelming. The five steps below can organize and speed up your revision process.

Step One: Start With The Story

Once you’ve let your novel sit for at least a week, read it all the way through. Focus on your plot, asking yourself:

  • Is there conflict on page one?
  • Does the plot turn in a significant way at each quarter point in the novel?
  • Is your protagonist actively pursuing her goals?
  • Does your antagonist strenuously oppose your protagonist?
  • Does tension increase as the story progresses?
  • Do the events logically flow from one another?
  • Does your climax resolve the major plot issues and pay off emotionally…

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Why I prefer nonfiction over fiction

Sarahbeth Caplin

35244821086_e8236a33a9_z1-300x200Since I was a child, I’ve dreamed of becoming the next great American novelist. I have published a few novels, and yet none of them are quite as dear to my heart as my two memoirs. I realized something critical about myself the more I’ve devoted myself to nonfiction writing (mostly about the intersection of faith and politics): I’m not very good at making things up.

If there’s anything I’ve learned during my time as a graduate student of creative nonfiction, it’s that memoir writing, and even literary essays, can follow a story arc similar to what you’ll find in fiction: there is a beginning, a development of conflict, a set of characters (even if the only character is the writer herself), a middle, and a resolution. Like fiction, nonfiction doesn’t require a neat, tidy ending. But a decisive finishing point is required just the same.

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Should You Publish a Second Edition…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

by Stephanie Chandler  on Nonfiction Authors Association Site:

The phrase “now in its second edition” would sound pretty great next to your nonfiction book title, wouldn’t it?

Traditional publishers might suggest a second edition if the first one sells well or if the content changes regularly. Indie authors can decide for themselves when the time is right to do a second, third, or fourth edition of their books.

I recently published a second edition of my book Subscription Marketing. Just over two years had passed since the first publication, but the Subscription Economy moves quickly. Stuff that seemed fresh in 2015 now looked stale. And my opinions have become stronger as I’ve spoken with people after the first edition.

So I took the plunge and updated the book. Along the way, I picked up a few pointers about doing a second edition. Here are the pros and cons, questions to…

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10 writing tips to get you started —

I Suck at Writing

Lack of inspiration? Struggling to articulate your thoughts clearly? Want to write but have no idea where to start? Here are 10 tips to get you thinking and writing. Have a notebook with you wherever you go. Inspiration can strike anytime. Read a variety of texts. Change up your perspective. Do not feel pressured to […]

via 10 writing tips to get you started —

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