Category Archives: Writing

Things to Consider Before Starting A Second Blog

Novelty Revisions

Some people find they love blogging so much that they want to do more of it. And sometimes, the urge to start and manage a second blog becomes too tempting to resist. That’s why many blogs fail — because people aren’t prepared for them. You’d think, already having one blog, you’d know better. But we’re writers, we’re not perfect — sometimes we make bad decisions that can hurt one or both of your blogs.

In this post, I’ll mostly be talking about starting a second blog on top of one you plan to continue keeping up with — not starting another blog to replace one you’re leaving behind. Most people assume they can keep up with more than one blog simultaneously, underestimating the amount of work that goes into each — causing both to fall apart. I don’t want that to happen to you. So here’s what you should think…

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Writing Tips – Outline or No Outline or is There a Third Option

Don Massenzio's Blog

This is a throwback blog regarding a technique that I still use today. The book I’m currently working on is a collaboration with another author and this technique has been extremely useful for keeping us on track. Please enjoy.


This blog post focuses on the topic of whether or not it is better to outline your book or short story before you dive in and write. When I wrote my first book, it was in the days before airplanes allowed tablet devices to be used during that down time before the flight took off. I fly through Atlanta from Jacksonville, FL every week and usually the time waiting to take off exceeds the actual flight time. During those dark ages when ALL electronic devices had to be off and stowed, I wrote my first novel completely in longhand in notebooks. It was an interesting exercise that was very time consuming…

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» 22 Calls for Themed Submissions (Short Stories, Poetry, and Essays)

Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

SHARED FROM AUTHORS PUBLISH: “This is a list of themed submission calls for a variety of topics, genres and audiences – fiction, poetry, non-fiction, interviews, and reviews. Topics include compassion for the natural world, romance, colonizing other worlds, reconciliation, and decolonization, stories about ruins and chefs, post-apocalyptic horror, themed stories for children, work by and about underrepresented communities, and about the afterlife of discarded objects. Payments range from none to token amounts, to a few hundred dollars or royalties.”

Have a read by clicking the link below:

Source: » 22 Calls for Themed Submissions (Short Stories, Poetry, and Essays)

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Just Write! Stop Waiting for the Good Stuff

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

By: Marilyn L. Davis

“A day of bad writing is always better than a day of no writing.” ― Don Roff

When I think of peoples’ job titles and descriptions, I get an idea of what they do every day.

  • Counselor? They listen to people talk about their problems, help them find solutions, and, well, counsel.
  • Artist? They draw, paint, and create, well, art.
  • Welder? They join metals together, fusing, compressing, and well, welding materials together.
  • Writer? Well, duh, they write.

I’ve said before that I have a hard time thinking of other professions where people are allowed to say, “I’m not feeling it.” Oh, maybe they say it, but they show up anyway. We writers, on the other hand, can avoid the pen/paper/computer/laptop and find umpteen reasons not to sit and write.

I think one of the poorest excuses we give ourselves is that we don’t have anything good…

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Creative Writing as Therapy: How Can Writing Help?

Welcome to Writerly Online

creativetherapy

Therapy can take many forms, and creative types of therapy are growing in popularity. The Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada integrates Music Therapy and Art Therapy as essential parts of the healing experience for kids staying in the hospital, as do many other hospitals including the Children’s Hospital Colorado, Children’s Hospital Philadelphia, and the Boston Children’s Hospital.

You don’t need a therapist, an art teacher, or a writing coach to use writing as a form of therapy for yourself. For this type of self-healing, you are completely in control. You never have to share your writing with anyone – in fact, you can burn it when you’re finished if you like.

Writing, whether autobiographical or fictional, allows us to imagine how a scenario might play out. Truth is stranger than fiction, and scenes from our own lives can end up in the middle of our…

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Ten Genres Defined

Ravenous for Reads

What the heck is a genre? For a word we use so often to describe our taste in music, books, or art, do we know what it means? A genre is a category that we assign depending on focus and style. By organizing tastes into specific genres, we create rules that define whether or not a book, band, or piece of art belongs to that group. If we want to be complicated, these rules also dictate the length of a book, the query letter approach, and, depending on the focus of the book, whether it falls under the traditional genre or a cross-sub genre. In short, genres are labels we apply to distinguish one work of art from another. Today,  I am going to define ten commonly known genres for you.

Fiction versus Nonfiction. This is what we call a no-brainer. Fiction is a work of literature that is entirely…

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Writing a Book: Overview

I’ve been a book coach for 19 years, working with people all over the world on memoir, novels, self-help books and even film scripts. I began my career as an international journalist (in newsrooms like London’s Financial Times).

People come to my company, Art of Storytelling, wanting to write and publish a book. Few understand the stages involved. I’m creating an outline of the stages here, and expounding upon them on my YouTube Art of Storytelling stream. Subscribe to both blog and stream to keep posted on more on the publication process. We assist people wherever they are at in the book writing process, from rough draft to publication.

Rough draft

Duration: On average, a rough draft takes a new writer one to two years to complete.

Skill sets: In this phase, you’ll be learning to develop characterization, setting, plot and theme.

Biggest Lesson: The greatest lesson you…

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