Category Archives: Saturday Book Review

Walking With The Wind: A Memoir of the Movement by John Lewis– Book Review by Julie Ahn

Race, Class and Ethnicity in American History

For a boy who grew up in the cotton farms of Alabama, to now a sixth-term United States Congressman, John Lewis led an extraordinary life that helped changed American history. Growing up knowing he was different from his cotton farming family, John Lewis left his Alabama home and went to Nashville to study at a Baptist college, where his life and the civil rights movement became inexorably entwined. John Lewis embarked on this peaceful protest and strode into the forefront of the civil rights movement partaking in the lunch counter sit ins, Freedom Rides, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, Bloody Sunday in Selma, and the March to Montgomery. Through all the threats, beatings, taunts, arrests, and injustice, John Lewis describes in his memoir, Walking with the Wind, how he challenged a system that was injustice and helped people of race to achieve their full potential, becoming one…

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Novelty Revisions

reading

I think there’s a big difference between reviewing a book – saying what you did and didn’t like about a story – and tearing apart a novel to highlight all the awful things about it. Criticizing a story is understandable. People do it all the time. It’s a story; it doesn’t have feelings. But when people turn to the writer of that story and start tearing them down for writing a story they did not like … I don’t know about you, but I have a problem with that.

As attached to her stories as a writer may become, a story does not tell you everything about its writer. They are still separate. I have a few words to share with readers who seem to think they know more about other writers’ stories than the writers themselves. Because as much as it might feel like it, a story that someone…

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Books and Lesser Evils

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My Throwback Thursday review is for  –

In the Heat of the Night by John Ball is one of those classic novels that does so much more than transcend the genre, it lays the foundation for it. The African American Detective who demanded respect not only for his actions, but for his intellect as well. Truthfully one has to imagine that there would never have been a John Shaft, Easy Rawlins, or Alex Cross; had there not been Virgil Tibbs. This is also, to be noted, a disappearing genre. Is there a mainstream popular current detective character in fiction right now that is African American? I would wonder if you could name more than two, and no fair naming the ones I already have.

“…You’re pretty sure of yourself, aren’t you, Virgil,’ Gillespie retorted. ‘Incidentally, Virgil is a pretty fancy name for a black boy like you. What do they…

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Review of Amye Archer’s Fat Girl, Skinny

BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog

41YCR2btxyL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_By Debbie Hagan

I’m working on a memoir about mental illness, and, at times, the process feels like a long, combative, and slightly schizophrenic therapy session. One part of me lies on the couch, reluctant to divulge details. The other part of me sits in the chair, pen poised, grilling my prone self: What did you mean by that? Are you telling the truth? Why are you so defensive? What’s wrong with you?

The analyst part of me can be rather brutal. That’s why me, quivering on the couch, eventually pops up, storms to the door, and cries, You’re just trying to embarrass me. While me in the chair shouts, Wait! We were just getting to the good stuff.

After a few hours of this, I sit back and wonder, have I at last fallen into the black abyss?

Reading Amy Archer’s sassy memoir Fat Girl, Skinny (Big Table…

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A Haven for Book Lovers

ArtImage-Large-PhenomenalWoman_c062b178-bcd5-45d3-baf6-9e1b7074cf53_grandePhenomenal Woman has always been one of my favorite poems by Maya Angelou. I first heard the poem when it was recited by Janet Jackson in a 90s movie also featuring, Tupac; Poetic Justice. I fell in love with the words. However, I only got to read my first book by Maya after her death.

I know why the Caged Bird Sings is one of the books in Maya Angelou’s autobiography series. The autobiography tells of a heartbreaking story of Maya and her brother, Bailey who were sent away from home by their parents at an early age. The children traveled alone with tags tied to their wrists written ‘To whom it may concern’. They moved in with their grandma at Swamps in Arkansas. Life in Arkansas was full of ups and downs. There was a lot of tension from the racism engulfing the town at the…

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TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD BY HARPER LEE

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To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Hachette Book Group Grand Central Edition

My Ratings: 5/5

Goodreads Synopsis: The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic.

Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior – to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. Now with over 18 million copies in print and translated into ten languages, this regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded…

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