Category Archives: Publishing

Why Self-Published Authors Are Amazing

Ask Alianne

If you’re following my blog, you’ve seen me post some rants about this or that. I do it to air out my own personal grievances, but also to shed some light on current events happening in the book world. Cathartic and educational. Win-win.

But today, I want to do something different. Today I want to tip my hat and give a nod to every self-published author out there, because the Indie community is a truly amazing and humbling place. Yes, it has its problems–all communities do–but on the whole, its members are some of the kindest, bravest, most supportive, most intelligent people I’ve ever had the pleasure of meeting.

Too often, the label of “Indie author” or “self-published author” still evokes the unfair stigma of being sub par, unworthy when compared to authors on the other side of that gilded line of traditional publishing. Today, I want to show you…

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When It’s Time To Stop Auditioning, Give Yourself the Job: Self/Hybrid Publish

| Rock+Paper+Music |

Let me start with a disclaimer: this is not a screed against traditional publishing. Yes, those are trendy and you’ll find lots of them out there, but this is not one. Life has taught me that when something sustains as long as traditional publishing has, it’s because it remains, however confounded and confused, a vital player in the scheme of things. I’d say that’s the case with the Big 5.

This is, instead, a few of my cobbled thoughts on the topic of why one might choose otherwise; why one might self-publish, or hybrid publish, or publish outside the realm of that iconic process of securing an agent who’ll, hopefully, wrangle a publishing deal, that will, hopefully, vaunt you into the stratosphere of big awards and New York Times bestseller lists. As much as one might dream of that starry-eyed path to literary greatness, there are myriad reasons why one might choose…

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Converting a Word document into an ebook

I learned this the hard way.

The Proof Angel

This is a subject that causes trouble all the time. People like to control the way their book looks. Well, that is perfectly reasonable, after all the effort you have put into it. With a hard copy, you can control exactly how the book looks, especially if you have a patient printer working with you.

The key things to remember are:

  • What you see on your screen when you look at your work is not the finished product. It is only part of the process.
  • For an ebook, much of the appearance is controlled by the reader. Their device will adapt to make the book fit the screen, and they will set the font size to make it legible.

Your goal when you have finished in Word is NOT to make it look pretty. It is to make a file that:

  • will work with the printer’s typesetting system, and
  • will…

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Should You Publish a Second Edition…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

by Stephanie Chandler  on Nonfiction Authors Association Site:

The phrase “now in its second edition” would sound pretty great next to your nonfiction book title, wouldn’t it?

Traditional publishers might suggest a second edition if the first one sells well or if the content changes regularly. Indie authors can decide for themselves when the time is right to do a second, third, or fourth edition of their books.

I recently published a second edition of my book Subscription Marketing. Just over two years had passed since the first publication, but the Subscription Economy moves quickly. Stuff that seemed fresh in 2015 now looked stale. And my opinions have become stronger as I’ve spoken with people after the first edition.

So I took the plunge and updated the book. Along the way, I picked up a few pointers about doing a second edition. Here are the pros and cons, questions to…

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Your Five-Minute Guide to Pricing Your Self-Published Book…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

By Fred Johnson on The Book Designer site:

There’s one question that we editors hear again and again from the self-publishing writers we work with: how much should I charge for my first book?

It’s certainly a tricky question. The history of self-publishing is littered with tragic tales of overpriced and underpriced books falling at the wayside as stingy or sceptical crowds pass them by. It’s one of the most common mistakes self-publishing writers make.

What’s the Problem?

Pricing your book isn’t a one-size-fits-all kind of deal. It depends on what you’ve written, how long your book is, how established you are as a writer, and any recognition, reviews, or awards you or your work have amassed. The quality of the cover, formatting, and design will also play an important role. Before you think about pricing your book, look over these tips…

Guide to Pricing Your Self-Published Book

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