Category Archives: Publishing

Converting a Word document into an ebook

I learned this the hard way.

The Proof Angel

This is a subject that causes trouble all the time. People like to control the way their book looks. Well, that is perfectly reasonable, after all the effort you have put into it. With a hard copy, you can control exactly how the book looks, especially if you have a patient printer working with you.

The key things to remember are:

  • What you see on your screen when you look at your work is not the finished product. It is only part of the process.
  • For an ebook, much of the appearance is controlled by the reader. Their device will adapt to make the book fit the screen, and they will set the font size to make it legible.

Your goal when you have finished in Word is NOT to make it look pretty. It is to make a file that:

  • will work with the printer’s typesetting system, and
  • will…

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Should You Publish a Second Edition…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

by Stephanie Chandler  on Nonfiction Authors Association Site:

The phrase “now in its second edition” would sound pretty great next to your nonfiction book title, wouldn’t it?

Traditional publishers might suggest a second edition if the first one sells well or if the content changes regularly. Indie authors can decide for themselves when the time is right to do a second, third, or fourth edition of their books.

I recently published a second edition of my book Subscription Marketing. Just over two years had passed since the first publication, but the Subscription Economy moves quickly. Stuff that seemed fresh in 2015 now looked stale. And my opinions have become stronger as I’ve spoken with people after the first edition.

So I took the plunge and updated the book. Along the way, I picked up a few pointers about doing a second edition. Here are the pros and cons, questions to…

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Your Five-Minute Guide to Pricing Your Self-Published Book…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

By Fred Johnson on The Book Designer site:

There’s one question that we editors hear again and again from the self-publishing writers we work with: how much should I charge for my first book?

It’s certainly a tricky question. The history of self-publishing is littered with tragic tales of overpriced and underpriced books falling at the wayside as stingy or sceptical crowds pass them by. It’s one of the most common mistakes self-publishing writers make.

What’s the Problem?

Pricing your book isn’t a one-size-fits-all kind of deal. It depends on what you’ve written, how long your book is, how established you are as a writer, and any recognition, reviews, or awards you or your work have amassed. The quality of the cover, formatting, and design will also play an important role. Before you think about pricing your book, look over these tips…

Guide to Pricing Your Self-Published Book

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Review of Green-Light Your Book by Brooke Warner

Author S. Smith

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In April I attended the IBPA PubU in Portland. More about that event here.  Included in our free tote bag with the regular goodies of pens, notepads, etc., was the book, Green-Light Your Bookby Brooke Warner of She Writes Press.

I read the book pretty quickly, but unfortunately didn’t write the review right away. As I look through it now, checking my underlines and attempting to write this review, I realize I could write several pages, much too long for a blog post. I’ll do my best to condense.

First, I really enjoyed Green-Light. Although it seemed meant for the person who has just finished their first manuscript and is still “waiting to be published,” as someone who’s already published several novels, I still found Green-Light to be thought-provoking, inspiring, and contain some useful info (for example, the section on the advantage of forming an LLC).

Anyone…

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