Walking With The Wind: A Memoir of the Movement by John Lewis– Book Review by Julie Ahn

Race, Class and Ethnicity in American History

For a boy who grew up in the cotton farms of Alabama, to now a sixth-term United States Congressman, John Lewis led an extraordinary life that helped changed American history. Growing up knowing he was different from his cotton farming family, John Lewis left his Alabama home and went to Nashville to study at a Baptist college, where his life and the civil rights movement became inexorably entwined. John Lewis embarked on this peaceful protest and strode into the forefront of the civil rights movement partaking in the lunch counter sit ins, Freedom Rides, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, Bloody Sunday in Selma, and the March to Montgomery. Through all the threats, beatings, taunts, arrests, and injustice, John Lewis describes in his memoir, Walking with the Wind, how he challenged a system that was injustice and helped people of race to achieve their full potential, becoming one…

View original post 1,504 more words

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s