Nine Strategies to Promote your Writing Locally

Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog

By Jessica Mcneil

Do you ever wonder what happens once an author has their first ever title created and presses the ‘Publish’ button? You may not be a New York Times best-selling author, you may not become famous immediately, and your Amazon numbers may be awful, but does this mean that you should quit writing books? Absolutely Not!

No matter what kind of book you compile, success in self-publishing is all about discoverability, especially if you want to reach your target audience. Listed below are a couple of low-cost strategies that you could put into use to ensure that you achieve the kind of visibility and popularity your writing deserves.

Nine ideas may seem a bit overwhelming, but keep in mind that you only have to put them into practice one at a time. When the expected results come to pass, you will have secured a direct connection to a vast…

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Jellyfish

ANNA WALDHERR A Voice Reclaimed, Surviving Child Abuse

Cyanea jellyfish, North Sea, Author Ole Kils olekils@web.de (CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported, GNU Free Documentation License)

Jellyfish are equipped with stinging tentacles used to paralyze, capture, and kill their prey.  The largest known specimen, the lion’s mane or giant jelly, has tentacles which can reach 120 feet in length.  That is longer than a blue whale.

The sting of a jellyfish can be agony.  In humans, that sting can cause burning and blistering of the skin, difficulty breathing, changes in heart rate, chest pain, abdominal cramps, vomiting, muscle spasms, numbness, weakness, and collapse.

The tentacles can sting, even after a jellyfish has died.

The Tentacles of Abuse

Like jellyfish, abuse has long tentacles.  Rather than extending into deep water, those tentacles extend across the years.  But their sting can still be agony.  Like the tentacles of jellyfish, the tentacles of abuse can paralyze, capture, and in some cases kill.

Real Wounds

Whether we suffer with physical ailments…

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Triangulation

PTSD - Accepting, Coping, Thriving

This technique in keeping a victim confused and down is sometimes called ‘bringing out the flying monkeys.’ (Wizard of OZ reference… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SESI19h4wDo ) When an abuser can’t put you down themselves, they enlist others to do their bidding.  Or if they can’t win an argument they will bring in a third party person to ‘gang up’ on you.  Of course the third party person heard a version spun to enhance the abuser and make the victim look like the aggressor.

PsychCentral described it this way: “The term is typically used to describe an individual who creates drama or confusion using 3 or more people in a situation.”  http://blogs.psychcentral.com/caregivers/2015/10/triangulation-the-problematic-family-member/

The person you email and their reply includes 2 or 3 other people not originally on the post.  Or the situation where another person is pulled in to prove their point.  I consider it the same technique as the school yard bully…

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4 Mistakes That Can Cost Your Book the Best Sellers List (Genre Categories)

Write Like Rowling

In my previous post I talked about virtual co-op and how most online bookstores sell their prime real estate to the highest bidder (i.e., large publishing houses). The exception is Amazon, whose co-op is mostly based on merit. In other words, Amazon gives away most of its prime spots to those books best suited to a particular reader’s tastes. Now the question is: how can a book show Amazon that it’s the best choice to recommend? That’s what we’ll be looking at in this final post on genre categories.

The 4 Big Mistakes

Many authors—and even publishing houses—don’t understand Amazon’s genre categories. This naïveté is extremely detrimental for sales because Amazon uses genre categories to fill its Best Sellers lists. In short, if you don’t understand how to categorize your book, you’re almost guaranteed lackluster sales. 

In this post I’ll again be drawing from David Gaughran’s book Let’s Get Visible: How to Get Noticed and Sell More Books.

Mistake #1: Your Categories Are Too Broad

For each book…

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What is Typesetting and Why Should You Care

Papeair

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You put lots of thought into your book. You consider the content you write and the eye catching cover of your book. What about the typesetting/formatting for your book? Do you think it is important?

Well, it really is!

Typesetting greatly affects the readability of your book. You are probably aware that grammar and spelling errors can distract the reader from the ideas you are trying to convey. Typesetting has a similar effect. The correct typeset will make it easier for the reader to comprehend the text. The wrong typeset will have the reader struggling to make sense of the text.

Readers don’t read individual letters. They read words. More familiar words are more easily recognized and read than unfamiliar ones. When readers read text they alternate between saccades (when the eye jumps from one point to another) and fixed periods. The text can only be comprehended during the fixed…

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