Changing Telling into Showing

ML Keller- The Manuscript Shredder

Transforming telling into showing in writing

Telling is a quick, efficient way to relate lots of information to a reader in a short amount of time. It works for writing transitions or other places where you need to move the timeline ahead, or where showing mundane details would bore readers. Despite its usefulness, “show don’t tell” is probably the most commonly given advice in writing. So why is it so hated?

Telling stops your story cold.

Every sentence spent telling your readers about something is time not spent moving the plot along. Imagine meeting someone for the first time over coffee and the entire conversation is her talking about people you have never met and her deepest darkest life experiences? You’d probably think she needs some serious counseling, but so many of the manuscripts I see begin this way.

Telling creates distance from your characters.

When readers don’t experience important parts of the character’s story with…

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Death and Taxes (in Self-Publishing)

Erin Thedwall

Death and Taxes.png

With a self-publishing roadmap in hand and company paperwork in order, it’s time to move on to everyone’s favorite topic: taxes.

This blog post from Helen Sedwick outlines why it’s so import to file for an EIN with the IRS, instead of relying solely on your Social Security Number. It’s quick and easy to fill out the form with the IRS – and you get your number immediately.

While already filling out federal paperwork, I also used this opportunity to file for a copyright with the U.S. Copyright Office. This form takes a little longer to fill out, and it can take several months before you hear back from the Copyright Office. Technically, your copyright exists from the moment you actually create your content. But having everything in place now could save a lot of effort and anguish down the road in the case of infringement.

Next up, business…

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#BookReview – P.S. I Forgive You – A Broken Legacy by D.G. Kaye #Memoir #Narcissism

deborahjay

On the eve of my father’s funeral, I find myself writing my review of this memoir with a real sense of gratitude that I was lucky enough to have loving parents, and little dysfunctionality in my family. My father was raised in a rather Victorian household, (he was born in 1915), where children were seen but not heard, which made him always a quiet man, but no less loving for it, though he rarely expressed emotion.

Tomorrow I shall say goodbye to him in the knowledge that he lived a long and satisfied life, leaving no regrets at the end on any of our parts, unlike my poor friend Debby Gies (author D.G. Kaye), who suffered a traumatic childhood.

Thanks, Debby. Whilst I sorrow for your travails, you’ve gifted me with a great contrast to recognise at this sad time how fortunate I have been.

P.S. I Forgive You: A Broken LegacyP.S. I Forgive You: A Broken Legacy by D.G…

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New Release: Renaissance: The Nora White Story (Book One) by Yecheilyah Ysrayl…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Yes, it’s Yecheilyah again. (Don’t everyone wave at the same time ). I borrowed the house keys from your favorite Ape to give you a last-minute reminder that Book One in The Nora White Story is available in just two days. It has been an amazing journey, filled with learning curves, ups, downs, delays, and revelations for sure. I hope this book is as fun and enlightening to you reading it as it was for me to write it.

Here’s what readers have to say:

“The author really did her research, touching on the feud between Zora and Langston over a play written by both, but only Zora was given credit. The way she wove Nora into the middle of the feud was genius. It was reminiscent of Forrest Gump a bit. (That, in my world is a HUGE compliment – I love Forrest Gump).” – Lisa W. Tetting

“When…

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How to Give Your Narration Flavor

A Writer's Path

by Andrea Lundgren

Readers frequently talk about the style or narrative flavor of authors they enjoy. They’ll say, “That sounds like something __ wrote,” or “This reminded me of ___” or “The tone of that was flat.” But sometimes, we authors we sometimes don’t know what gives us our writing voice. What makes writing sound different or interesting and engaging?

Our voice is really the flavor that is distinctly ours. It’s like the spices that make Italian different than French or German cooking. They may have similar topography or features; in certain portions of those countries, there may just be an imaginary line between one part and another, to where the climate, soil types, and weather are identical. Similarly, our writing might be similar to that of another in genre, plot elements, and character types but yet be unique because of the “spices” we employ.

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Yecheilyah’s Book Reviews – Even Rain is Just Water: A Memoir of Rejection, Revelation & Redemption by Lynette Davis

Pearls Before Swine

Title: Even Rain is Just Water: A Memoir of Rejection, Revelation & Redemption

Author: Lynette Davis

Print Length: 296 pages

Publisher: Reflections Books; 1 edition (May 30, 2017)

Publication Date: May 30, 2017

Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC

Language: English

ASIN: B071DC83TN

*I received this book as a gift from the author*

When I first read the title of this book, I knew that I would read it. With a powerful statement, as Even Rain is Just Water it had to be good. I was not disappointed. Lynette Davis gives us a riveting account of her life as the victim of emotional abuse at the hands of someone who is to be a girl’s first teacher, supporter, and motivator. Her mother.

The testimony switches back and forth between Lyn’s experiences as a child and as an adult, both of which include some form of emotional abuse and neglect. Lyn’s…

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The Elusive Value of PR as a Book Marketing Tactic

How To Ebook

by EMILY WENSTROM

The Elusive Value of PR as a Book Marketing Tactic

When I am not being an author, my full-time job is in public relations.

As one might imagine, the value of, say, being quoted in a magazine feature article, is harder to measure than most other marketing efforts. It’s pretty rare to see a direct jump in sales as a result of such a placement.

More often than not, these mentions are cumulative:

A reader sees you over here in a magazine.

Then later they see you over there in a newspaper.

Later, her friend mentions your book as one of many on a list of new releases.

And in this way, a person gradually develops a familiarity with you without being able to point to a specific touchpoint for it.

Because of this, I sometimes find myself in the position of having to explain to clients why what I do for them matters.

The same is…

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