How Could I Write a Book About Myself and Not Know It?

Originally posted on Commonplace Grace:

Glory in the Morning Book coverNo matter where you go – there you are” ― Confucius

I shared my picture book,Glory in the Morning with the world today. That is code for saying it’s now available on Amazon. Getting this book into physical form and into the hands of children has been quite an experience. When I wrote and illustrated it, I had no idea it would be a way for me to speak my truth. After all, there was no deep thought required to get the words down on paper. It was just a fairytale that seemed to write itself. Today, I see it as a story that affirms my journey to wholeness. It reminds me of the powerful truths embodied in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. I’m curious if the author, Frank L. Baum, figured out that he had been writing about himself, too?

“Just be yourself, there is no one…

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What is your past to you?

Originally posted on iamtitimabitsela:

The past is a mirror. The reflection of what we are in the present. The wrinkles, the acne, and the scars all tell a story of where we been, what we’ve done and what we’ve become. Some look into this mirror with disgust. Some try to hide it with make-up because of all the imperfections they assume to be seeing, or even to make it appear more acceptable. Some admire it because of the experience it has afforded them; you hear them say the past is a foundation of every great tale. What do you see when you look into your mirror

A mask of life, a mask covering strife?

The past is a thief in the night. It sneaks up behind you, no guarantee if it will steal your life or take your acquired possessions, as though you owe it. If you carry too much, you are its…

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September Author Interview Answer #5: How do you felt when you managed to complete a book?

Originally posted on International Book Promotion:

Hello everyone, I hope you have enjoyed reading the forth post in this interview series. This is the continuation of the interview with author Debby G. Kaye and Linda Gray Sexton. Please check their bios out via the links you can see below.

Let’s check out the answers for question #5 from them.

“How do you felt when you managed to complete a book?”

Author #1 D. G. Kaye

After completing my book, besides the feeling of accomplishment, I was very apprehensive about publishing it. I stalled the publication for a few weeks, even after it was ready for print. I had several conversations with my siblings for approval, making sure that they were okay with my publishing the book. At the time, I was scared that my mother might read it and consider having me sued. That thought instilled a new burden of guilt I felt; only this time, it…

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September Author Interview Answer #4: How supportive is your family and friends in your writing career?

Originally posted on International Book Promotion:

Hello everyone, I hope you have enjoyed reading the third post in this interview series. This is the continuation of the interview with author Debby G. Kaye and Linda Gray Sexton. Please check their bios out via the links you can see below.

Let’s check out the answers for question #3 from them.

“How supportive is your family and friends in your writing career? ”

Author #1 D. G. Kaye

A writer’s life is complex. Much of the time, we live in our heads. I don’t feel that many of the people in my life really understand the life of a writer; all the time and seclusion involved. With saying this, I do have two of my closest friends that cheer me on and don’t give me a hard time for the lack of my presence in their lives. My husband is wonderful. He lets me be and doesn’t approach…

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Simon and Schuster inks deal with Amazon: Publisher will control ebook prices

Originally posted on Shelf Life:

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Simon & Schuster has signed a new multiyear contract with Amazon that gives the publisher nearly full autonomy over ebook pricing. Both dealmakers appear to be pleased with the agreement, going into effect Jan. 1, 2015. S&S chief executive Carolyn Reidy said in a letter obtained by The New York Times that the deal “is economically advantageous for both Simon & Schuster and its authors and maintains the author’s share of income generated from eBook sales.” The publisher will gain control over determining the prices of its authors’ ebooks, “with some limited exceptions,” according to the letter. Amazon, for example, can still offer some discount deals.

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Little Known Black History Fact: Samaria Bailey

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Originally posted on Black America Web:

Samaria Bailey is a civil rights figure from Macon, Ga., who was the first Black girl to integrate an all-white, all-female high school in 1964. Ms. Bailey was also among the first Black women to enroll at Mercer University, and went on to have a stellar career as a medical technologist. Bailey was born Samaria Mitcham on June 29, 1947.

She was the second-oldest of ten children. Her father was a cook in Macon and her mother was a housewife who went back to school and graduated from Wesleyan College when her children were grown. Bailey was among the select group of Black students handpicked by Mercer University Men’s Dean Joseph Hendricks to integrate A.L. Miller High and the Lanier High School for Boys.

Hendricks could have been inspired by President John F. Kennedy’s campaign pledge in 1960 to do more for African-American students. Along with a friend, Dean Hendricks…

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The Tomatoes Could Be Terrible. Write Anyway.

Originally posted on BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog:

heirloom_tomatoesI just started working as an editor. I’m freelance, so I see a lot of self-published work, some of which fits every horrible stereotype about self-publishing. But no matter how near the beginning of their craft the author is, they’re still one up on me:

They finished a book.

They didn’t wait for the Fairy MFAmother to whack them with her magic Now You May Go To The Writer Ball wand, they didn’t let their mother’s dismissals or their lack of time stop them. They followed Nora Roberts‘ (and so many other prolific big-name authors’) maxim:

Ass in chair.

For us creative nonfictioneers, it’s often not a failure of imagination or work ethic, but a fear of not measuring up that dogs our ability to finish–or even start.

Should I write about the cancer? Nah, everyone’s got a cancer memoir. What about that time we broke up? Modern Love…

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Getting a Strong Start on Your Memoir

Originally posted on The Write Stuff:

pumping iron therapyMy advice is to find a half hour in the morning, before your day gets upon you, to write. It’s one of the best creative times of the day — because you can carry forward your subconscious dream work into the writing. Plus, the interruptions of the day that can pull you off your creating haven’t surfaced yet.

– How to start if you have not begun? Think about this: What is the question you are trying to answer with your memoir? The question can change, and it usually will. My own memoir started with “How did I make that happy two weeks of baseball with Nicky? Where did my optimism emerge from?” It has evolved to “What lessons from my father changed my fatherhood route with my son? How did I change the rules for a perfect game?”

If you’re free-writing now, that’s good. Prompts that are helpful are…

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Journey of a Memoirist III

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Originally posted on Margaret Benison:

War was among the various other traumas I faced in the year 2006. When I started writing my memoirs, I could only recall highlights of the events I had been through in my life—good and bad. I was writing snippets of scenes that played in my head. They had no context, because I had forgotten—or chose to forget—what lead to those incidents, and how they changed me. Now that I finished writing about this period of my life, I feel more connected (to myself). I am seeing the bigger picture. Not merely recalling events of my life, I feel like an outside observer who’s watching characters interact and is able to connect those interactions to future habits, fears, interests, and beliefs.

Writing my memoirs was meant for me to have closure, and to give hope to whomever reads them. If I could go through all that and survive, so can…

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September Author Interview Answer #3: How was the response from your family and friends when you first published a book?

Originally posted on International Book Promotion:

Hello everyone, I hope you have enjoyed reading the second post in this interview series. This is the continuation of the interview with author Debby G. Kaye and Linda Gray Sexton. Please check their bios out via the links you can see below.

Let’s check out the answers for question #3 from them.

“How was the response from your family and friends when you first published a book?”

Author #1 D. G. Kaye

My friends and family cheered me on for getting the stories out of my head and onto paper. My sister thought it would be therapeutic to write my story, and help to alleviate some of the burden of guilt I carried for my mother. It was cathartic I have to admit. But erasing a lifetime of guilt is always a work in progress.

Author #2 Linda Sexton
It varied.  My first memoir, Searching for Mercy Strreet, was…

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